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  1. #21
    eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Making contact prints is too costly and slow.
    Not if your proofing is calibrated. All of my contacts are made at the same enlarging height/f stop/ time.
    I do them at the beginning of my printing sessions, before I start printing from previously proofed negatives.
    For viewing them (as well as negatives on the lightbox), I have 8x10 black cardboard cut, in the center, with the various film sizes I use. I find this makes it easier to isolate frames/sheets (and diminish extra light, in the case of the lightbox).

  2. #22
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #23
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    You just need a better loupe.

  4. #24
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I'm thinking of using my iPad to view proofs with this. I can have a virtual grease pencil using a stylus. I would have to digitize my negs first. I use Evernote and it's a great app.

    http://evernote.com/skitch/
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  5. #25
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    One sheet of paper is to costy for a whole film?
    There is no point for me in making contact prints, because I still have to look at the contact print with a loupe afterward. How has that saved any work versus just looking at the negatives? I find looking at negatives easier and more informative that looking at contact prints anyway.

    For the Nth time; I do not have trouble interpreting negatives. I'm not looking for techniques or solutions to make interpreting individual negatives easier. I know a good negative when I see one. I never say "oh, that's a good negative" and then find out it's not good when I print it. That's never my problem. My problem is the 50-roll backlog of film that I need to proof right now.

    I'm looking for techniques to speed the process of sifting through a large number of negatives, to find perhaps 1 negative in 100 that is worth printing. A loupe and a lightbox is my current technique, but my problem with doing this on a lightbox is simply the strain of hunching over a light box looking at so many tiny negatives through a loupe. A method that would allow me to sit up straight and use both eyes is what I need. Some of the video-scanner devices presented in this thread, and the idea of using a DSLR to snap a picture of a whole roll, or possibly use a tablet as a loupe, all seem like ideas worth pursuing.

    If I could scan a whole strip of 35mm in 5 seconds and view the images on a computer screen, that would be an improvement, but scanners are WAY too slow for this to be useful. If there was a device I could run the strip of film through and project a larger image I could view with both eyes then that might be an improvement. I thought about buying a 35mm filmstrip projector and just feed my rolls through it for proofing, but they won't project a whole 24x36mm frame, and still cameras all have different frame spacings.
    f/22 and be there.

  6. #26
    Barry S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    This sounds cool...
    The Macbeth Prooflite V135 in action---

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #27
    fotch's Avatar
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    I use to use a pro-lab that could proof a whole roll enlarged to a large sheet, 16x20 or 20x24 ( don't remember which). They must of used an 8x10 enlarger.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #28
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Vaguely reminds me of

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry S View Post
    The Macbeth Prooflite V135 in action---

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The old Kodak PVAC I used at a job I had when I printed color.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  9. #29
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry S View Post
    The Macbeth Prooflite V135 in action---

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	415.0 KB 
ID:	89613
    Cool! Does that have a way to use strips of film in addition to slides?
    f/22 and be there.

  10. #30
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Looks dedicated to slides but very very high quality.

    You could always tape some cardboard to it to lay a channel for strips of negatives.

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