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  1. #11

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    Or, there's this. It folds to about 8" thick for storage.

    http://portablelaundryvalet.wordpres...station-white/
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  2. #12

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    I have a large dry mount press (Seal 500), and I built a bench for that which is ~36"x36" and about 30" high, beneath the table that holds the press, I have slots where I can slide screens for print drying under the dry mount press. My screens are 30" x 30" each, and I have 6. They were made from the aluminum frame material that Home Depot sells, and fiberglass screen material. I don't think that they were expensive to build.

  3. #13
    ROL
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    It can be pretty simple, the main multiplier being the number and size of screens:

    Techniques –> A Darkroom Portrait –> Drying Racks


    I would caution against the indiscriminate use of heat and/or forced air in drying, particularly in the case of fiber based papers, unless heavy turn around times are required. Fiber papers dry best and most evenly in ambient conditions with no less than moderate relative humidity. In other words, slower drying will go along way to preventing prints from becoming curly fries and crispy critters, the apparent bane of many. As far as RC papers go, just throw 'em in the dryer with the rest of your wet wash.

  4. #14

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    I like the heater device idea, but I think for my needs a drying rack may still be best. I typically print at night right up until I go to bed, so I like to just get the water off then throw it on a screen and go to sleep. With the box it seems like I have to wait a half an hour and shuffle.

    I guess one of my main questions is exactly what type of screen material to use? What material and texture and where can I source it?

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    It can be pretty simple, the main multiplier being the number and size of screens:
    [/I][/B]I would caution against the indiscriminate use of heat and/or forced air in drying, particularly in the case of fiber based papers, unless heavy turn around times are required. Fiber papers dry best and most evenly in ambient conditions with no less than moderate relative humidity. In other words, slower drying will go along way to preventing prints from becoming curly fries and crispy critters, the apparent bane of many. As far as RC papers go, just throw 'em in the dryer with the rest of your wet wash.

    This is very important, this should not be used to rush or heat the prints in any way during the drying. The idea with the hot air is to take moist out of the blotting paper which can be used to dry prints without the fan. So the print should not be warm to touch when doing the drying. For archive purpose I have spoken with photo paper archivist experts at the Elysee museum in Lausanne and they all concluded that as long as the print is washed properly (most important for them), is rotated regular and the fan is not heating the print for a long period then this method is a very good method to reach paper stability. They even said that drying with blotting paper in a humid environment is better for the print due to some kind of paper oxidation that happen if the paper stay moist for a long time....... ( I am not a chemist so blacked out a bit when they went technical).
    They also pointed out that you apply much much more heat in a dry mounting press then this method.

    So it just come down to your way of working, print rack takes time and space but you can put them down and walk away. Using a blotting paper and fan takes less space and less time, but will require that you hang around for another 30 min.

  6. #16

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    Some of my screens are sash-window inserts from the hardware store (California), separated into two parts. These units normally have two sliding screen sections to accommodate different widow widths. I have a couple of Kostiner ones, and a few others that I picked up used locally.

    I have a small darkroom, so I put in a couple of slats just under the ceiling and above the sink. The screens sit on that. Prints are surface wiped with an old Paterson print wiper, and dried face up. I can work while prints are drying, but I usually do it overnight.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  7. #17

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    For material all you need is fiberglass screen from a hardware store.
    Also materials for making custom sized frames.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #18
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    I found this at Home Depot. It was supposed to take sliding drawers, but instead I made up some screen to put in the slots.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #19
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    Can someone who is using drying screens post a crappy photo of what the print looks like in terms of curl after drying on the screen? Do you need to hot-press it afterwards? If you're screen-drying, how do you mount your prints for framing if you're not using a hot press?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Can someone who is using drying screens post a crappy photo of what the print looks like in terms of curl after drying on the screen? Do you need to hot-press it afterwards? If you're screen-drying, how do you mount your prints for framing if you're not using a hot press?
    Don't have a shot and am not the most experienced with fiber papers but I will say that after a few hundred tries the only way I've ever gotten fiber prints truly flat is to have them mounted.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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