Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,557   Posts: 1,573,229   Online: 991
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21
    jp80874's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Bath, OH 44210 USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,442
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    I found this at Home Depot. It was supposed to take sliding drawers, but instead I made up some screen to put in the slots.
    Attachment 90602
    I bought a darkroom years ago that included a Zone VI print drying rack/box. When I take the paper out of the washer I squeegee off the running water then put the print face down on the screen. I bought a second set of screens. I put a second screen on top of the print. There is still some room for movement in that the screens match frame to frame, not screening material to screening material. Still the semi confinement greatly reduces curl.

    The print dryer has a hair dryer attachment. I use Kentmere Fineprint paper. If I use the heat of the hair dryer I get curl, fine heavily rumpled curl. The paper dries too fast. If I use the fresh cool air, I get less curl. If I just let the paper dry over night in my basement darkroom I get very little curl. I take that out with a Seal 16x20 dry mount press.

    I think if you did what ic-racer did and added a second set of screens you would have all the advantages of a Zone VI dryer. Of course if you can't locate the frame he uses, you could copy it in wood or metal for much less than the $600 Calumet used to charge for the box I have.

    John Powers
    "If you want to be famous, you must do something more badly than anybody in the entire world." Miroslav Tichı

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    258
    I'm guessing I would want the finest (as in small grid) I can find, right?

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    258
    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Can someone who is using drying screens post a crappy photo of what the print looks like in terms of curl after drying on the screen? Do you need to hot-press it afterwards? If you're screen-drying, how do you mount your prints for framing if you're not using a hot press?


    Here's one I just pulled off my crappy screen and saw horse set up. They're definitely curvy but if you put the, under some books for a bit they come out pretty flat. It's best if you do it right after they're dry.

  4. #24
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by mexipike View Post
    I guess one of my main questions is exactly what type of screen material to use? What material and texture and where can I source it?
    Well, it was in my link. Standard fiberglass. Any screen maker. The vaunted and unnecessarily expensive ZVI screens are just those – nothing more exotic.

  5. #25
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,325
    Images
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by mexipike View Post
    Here's one I just pulled off my crappy screen and saw horse set up. They're definitely curvy but if you put the, under some books for a bit they come out pretty flat. It's best if you do it right after they're dry.
    thanks! That's not too bad.

    I had a thought that pertains to the fan-forced stacked-blotting-paper dryer. What happens if you squeegee a print emulsion-down onto glass and let it dry? Will it stick? If not, then maybe layering the fan-forced dryer as follows might be an easy set-and-forget means to obtain a flat print: glass, print, blotter, corrugations, glass, etc.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    857
    Images
    42
    That's about the amount of curl I get. Local temperature and humidity can affect the amount of curl. I usually get most of the curl out by placing the print emulsion down on a clean hard surface, and running a straight edge over the back, corner to corner while lifting the corner behind the straightedge as it moves across the print. You don't want to be too aggressive, but it stretches the emulsion enough that I can mat mount prints without adhesive. This is out to an image area of around 11x14 inches. Long term storage is best done under weight.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  7. #27
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by grahamp View Post
    Long term storage is best done under weight.
    Really?!? Prints may be left under weight for a few weeks, to flatten them in lieu of using a heated mounting press, but I wouldn't suggest it as long term storage. I don't even see how that could be accomplished without excessive cost and great amounts of storage space and numerous weights. Once prints are flattened, even though they may exhibit a very small amount of bend in one direction, I would advise stacking loosely, preferably with appropriate interleaving tissue, in acid free media storage. Under the weight of so many stacked prints in boxes, flat files, etc., prints should relax and flatten adequately for hinge or corner mounting.


  8. #28

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Downers Grove Illinois
    Posts
    1,053
    [QUOTE=sandholm;1668113]Hi,

    I dont use rack drying anymore because of 3 reasons, space, curl and time, instead i build a fiber based dryer designed by a fellow apug member; Reinhold

    Have a look at: http://www.classicbwphoto.com/classi...int_Drier.html
    The print drys in 1 hour and comes out very flat. I am using an archive blotting paper (which you have to change rather often but its very cheep). Have a look at the the build.

    Cheers
    Anders[/QUOTE

    IF YOU search the archives, I have promoted this concept as being best. Salthill marketed the device in the 80`s for a hefty sum. I could not find the cash, however I would have had I realized it was the best. A neighbor found one that works on similar principle that was really old. $15 at a pro photographers retirement garage sale. I am guessing it was from the 50`s & made by the same company that made the cheap grey view cameras. Can`t remember the name.

    The only other thing that worked for me was taping the print edges emulsion out to a basswood drawing board. The tape messes up the print and I could only do 2 at a time.

    My advice is build the blotter stack instead. corrigated board, blotter, squeeged print, blotter, corrigated board. The fan pulls air across the blotters thru the corrigations.

  9. #29
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,325
    Images
    12
    Well, I bought some corrugated cardboard (removalist boxes!) and A2 blotting paper this week. I've got some 12mm ply sitting in the shed (same as what I made the film dryer with) so if it's clear this weekend, there might be a quick bout of sawing and screwing. I might look for a cheap fan-heater tomorrow, otherwise I've got some spare 12V computer fans that would serve I think. Decisions: do I make it to fit 16x20" (my usual max print size) or 20x24"? I may have recently scored a 20x24 easel but the outer dimensions would make the dryer a real pain to store.

  10. #30
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,325
    Images
    12
    I wussed out and built it for 16x20", since that's the largest paper and easel that I own. Construction is 8mm plywood, unvarnished and screwed together; weight-board is a 15mm laminated chipboard. Fans are 2x80mm 12V, with a 7812 (linear regulator) dead-bugged on the back of the socket because the plugpack I dug up produces more like 16V and the fans really howl at that voltage. Plenty of air coming out the front of the cardboard, nice and uniform across the width of the dryer.

    I haven't actually dried anything with it yet, maybe I'll experiment with some FB and Selenium this weekend.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_20140716_152108_th.jpg   IMG_20140714_175840_th.jpg   IMG_20140716_152056_th.jpg  

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin