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  1. #1

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    Drying rack materials and build

    I've been using a pretty lame setup for drying racks using two saw horses and an old window screen lying around. It works ok but I would like to build a nice rack that I can dry everything on. What material do people use for the screen? Ideally I could source it fairly easily at the local Home Depot etc.
    Any tips would be greatly appreciated. I have searched here but didn't quite find what I was looking for.


    Thanks,

    John

  2. #2

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    Hi,

    I dont use rack drying anymore because of 3 reasons, space, curl and time, instead i build a fiber based dryer designed by a fellow apug member; Reinhold

    Have a look at: http://www.classicbwphoto.com/classi...int_Drier.html
    The print drys in 1 hour and comes out very flat. I am using an archive blotting paper (which you have to change rather often but its very cheep). Have a look at the the build.

    Cheers
    Anders

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandholm View Post
    Hi,

    I dont use rack drying anymore because of 3 reasons, space, curl and time, instead i build a fiber based dryer designed by a fellow apug member; Reinhold

    Have a look at: http://www.classicbwphoto.com/classi...int_Drier.html
    The print drys in 1 hour and comes out very flat. I am using an archive blotting paper (which you have to change rather often but its very cheep). Have a look at the the build.

    Cheers
    Anders
    I saw that a while ago and forgot about it, looks like a pretty good idea. I wish he had more pictures explaining the construction. Does the heater just blow on the top? I have a heater and plenty of mdf and cardboard so may give it a shot.

  4. #4
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I made a set of screens, I think any plastic windowscreen material would be fine. Actually just made them up like screens. Cost a fortune though, I think you could get them from a professional glazier for less than I made them from local hardware store materials.

    The screens just sit in a frame of fingers that holds them out...

    I place my prints face-up because I want NO screen pattern, a phobia of mine. As soon as I put the prints on the screen I lean them vertically for a few minutes to drain the majority of water off. Leaves a few rivulets of droplets but no real water puddles... Then I set them in the fingers and let them dry a day or two.

    I have a dry mount press that I use to flatten them after.

  5. #5
    nsurit's Avatar
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    Nylon/plastic window screens should work. I have a set of Zone VI screens and that is what they are made from. I have a rack they mount in (it holds 15) that I could send you a picture of if you want. The rack mounts to the wall and has a foot print of one screen. I would require some amount of wood working skills and tools to construct. Bill Barber

  6. #6
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I use one of these which seems to work quite well:-

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ma...27%3B500%3B495

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #7

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    i built a rack years ago and it works like a charm.
    what i did was make a box out of plywood ..
    it is open in the front, and about 3" down from the top
    and the sides do not go all the way to the floor.
    and i put frame-molding inside as a track.
    i got cheap lathe and made my frames ... and i didn't
    45º cut them just attached them ... i used a staple gun
    then i got window screen and stapled that onto the top of the
    rectangular frames ...
    they slide in and out of the track, i can dry 20x24 or 2x3 or smaller prints on
    3 or 4 screens without any issue and the only real cost was the plywood, 2x4's and angle irons
    (to make the box ) for the top i put a large sheet of 1/4" plywood and cheap countertop and use it as
    a workspace too.

    took about 1/hr to make the screens and less time to make the box ...
    the box takes up space but that's ok i have a ton of junk on top of it ..

    have fun!
    john
    a

  8. #8

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    You might want to have a few more looks at that drier Reinhold built to puzzle it out. It looks very simple and easy to build. Quite ingenious. And if it can dry eight 16x20 prints in less than an hour, wow, that's just great.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by mexipike View Post
    I saw that a while ago and forgot about it, looks like a pretty good idea. I wish he had more pictures explaining the construction. Does the heater just blow on the top? I have a heater and plenty of mdf and cardboard so may give it a shot.
    Its a really cool system and its fast and makes an excellent result. I am traveling so I can take any images but its a really easy build.

    How I build it.

    You can see the build as two stages, one box containing the fan ( i will call it the fan box) and a tray holding your print, blotting paper and corrugated board.

    Build:

    First I made the box holding the fan. Its a MUST that you can turn of the heat on the fan and only run air.
    See the fan box as a box with a missing side (the side that connects to the print tray) and a hole at the top where the fan sits and blow down. Personal i mounted the fan on the top because I didnt want it too blow at the prints but I am not sure if its a must, it cant hurt having the air not hitting the prints direct.
    The fan box has the same height and width as the print tray.

    Next is the tray that holds your prints, it contains of a base and two sides, the width of the base is the same as the fan box and the height of the sides should be the same height as your fan box height.

    This is it, now either connect your fan box with the print tray or keep them as two units.

    Usage:

    Usage, when I have wet prints ( I have two, one for 11x14 and my new one for 20x24) I start by completely squeegee them as dry as I dare, I don't want a single drop of water on them (it leaves spots)

    At the bottom of the "print tray" I place a corrugated board of the size of the print tray with the "air holes" in the paper going in the direction of the air flow ( so they channel the air from the fan box to the front).
    then I place one blotting paper ( replace them often ) and then a print, then a blotting paper, then a corrugated board, a blotting paper, a print, a blotting paper, a corrugated board.....

    When you have stacked all your prints you want to dray you place a board on top. If the print tray is not filled up to the top, so there is a space at the back where air can escape then I place another MDF board at the back that close this gap.
    Do not place any weights on top of your stack, if you do your prints will glue together, also do not leave wet paper in the tray without rotating them.

    Now I run the heat on low heat for 3-4 min, then no heat for another 3-4 min. The air will now flow from the fan box through the air channels in the corrugated board and exit on the front of the print tray. Now you unstack your prints and replace the blotting paper with dray once and do the process over again. I do this (it takes 20-30 min max) until the prints are almost dry and then I run cold air through the system for another 20-30 min. I dont change the blotting paper ( if they not are wet but then I run some more warm air through the pack) but I do unstack the prints and re-stack them, just to make sure they dont stick to the blotting paper.

    Now you prints are dry and flat

    Its a very very simple build and procedure. The best feature is that your prints will be dry in 1 hour and flat. Screens works also perfect but they do need more space, and take longer time.

    PM me if you have any question (or just write in the forum)

    Cheers
    Anders

  10. #10
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    In the Navy I wiped surface water from fiber prints, laid them out on my bunk, and covered them with a sheet and blanket. The weight of the blanket kept them fairly flat while drying. Drying took longer than the methods in the above posts.

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