Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,935   Posts: 1,557,054   Online: 1258
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 47
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    46
    Images
    7

    Medium Format Less Sharp?

    I have noticed when enlarging my 6x7 negatives they show far less grain than my 35mm prints; however, the 35mm prints still appear slightly sharper. I am using the same enlarger for both, and lenses used for each format are the same Rodenstock model lens with only the obviously differing focal length. It's difficult to judge from the small contact prints if the negatives themselves are sharper or if something is going on during enlarging. I use the Mamiya with a tripod and mirror lock up, so I can't imagine technique is an issue. Out of curiosity I had a pro lab do some scans, and the results were in line with what I have been seeing from the darkroom. What gives?

    Could it be that my Leica camera lenses are simply noticeably sharper than those for my Mamiya RZ67? I'm not sure if it's a film flatness issue because within each print every area is uniformly sharp.

    P.S. Yes, I know sharpness isn't everything. I'm just really curious.

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,287
    It's difficult to judge from the small contact prints if the negatives themselves are sharper or if something is going on during enlarging.
    If you have access to the negatives, examining them is the only way to know what is going on.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    52
    I had the same experience when switching from Pentax LX (35mm) to a Pentax 67II. This was disappointing at first but now, after many years, I appreciate the amount of detail and tones which comes with the larger format (6x7).

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    California desert
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    868

    well established

    It has been pretty well established by photogs who have worked in 35mm and larger formats for the last 50-plus years that a big negative is always better presuming that you have done everything right. Something is amiss with your process somewhere.

  5. #5
    Chrismat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brewer, Maine
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    512
    I have heard that most 35mm lenses are (generally) sharper than medium and large format lenses because of the amount of magnification a 35mm negative or slide has to go through for printing.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    California desert
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    868

    green men

    One should not listen to little green men who come from outer space and spin impossible yarns.

  7. #7
    brian steinberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    2,334
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    100
    The answer here seems pretty obvious. The larger neg will enlarge to a much larger size until it shows grain. If you're printing both the 35mm and 6x7 to the same print size the 6x7 will always look smoother and even slightly less sharp simply because it's a larger negative. Until you get to a larger print size. Enlarge both negatives to 20 x 24 and let us know what you think then. I bet you'll like the 6x7 neg better. Grain isn't always a bad thing. There is a sweet spot with a particular print size for each format where the grain gives just enough feel to promote sharpness. In 35mm it's around 5x7 or 6x9. If you enlarge your 6x7 negs to this size there won't be as much grain and they can appear soft. All that said I have no doubt the Leica glass is sharper than the sekor lenses.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    OK, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    337
    You might want to verify using a test target with each camera . . . found here, and elsewhere on the web. Printed at 8x10 using a laser printer, it should work very well. At some point in the process, be it the negative stage or the printing/enlargement stage, a test target pattern on film could reveal any problems resolution-wise. It could also reveal problems involving contrast. Are your lens elements (front and rear) free of finger prints, mold, fungus, fogging, etc, anything that could interfere with sharpness or contrast or both? This would also include the enlarger lens. I'm assuming here that you're not using the same lens to print 35mm as 6x7.
    6X4.5cm, 6x6cm/6x9cm, 6x7cm, 5x4, 4x5, Half-Plate, 5x7, Full-Plate, 8x10, 12x10

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,602
    Do you use the same developer for both formats?

  10. #10
    BetterSense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,878
    "sharp" is a fuzzy concept.

    It's possible for smaller formats to appear more sharp at the same final print magnification either because of more visible grain, which can be perceived as enhancing sharpness, or because of accutance effects.

    Although larger film typically contains more information (i.e. resolution) I personally do not find that the larger formats appear sharper all the time. Larger formats are often praised for their "smoothness" and "detail" but that doesn't always translate into a superficial perception of "sharpness". You may well get a sharper-looking photograph from using rodinal than using D23, even if the former developer recovers less image information.

    A given film emulsion, exposure and developer will have certain MTF properties. Changing the magnification of the film image while holding the final print magnification constant is sort of like changing the "Radius" control of a digital unsharp mask.
    f/22 and be there.

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin