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  1. #1

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    Chemical treatment..?

    Hey guys,

    I was surfing Darkroom printing on youtube. I saw interesting vid of a Japanese fellow , a young guy.. doing darkroom printing. Everything made sence, however there was one part that caught my curiuosity.. While print was still wet, hey put it in a open face cabinet and treated a couple area with some sort of chemical treatment with a brush.. it wasn't spot toning it was something else. Can anyone here tell maybe from was discribe what he might be doing.

    Todd

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    He may have been bleaching parts of the print - do you have a link?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3

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  4. #4
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    He is bleaching the print to open shadow areas or pop the highlight, what he isn't showing is that after doing that step its back to the fix, or the print will eventually be screwed.

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Yep - localized bleaching.

    I'd be cautious emulating him too closely at first, as he handles the wet paper quite vigorously and a lot. That takes a fair bit of experience if you are going to avoid damaging your prints.

    EDIT: What Bob says. In general, in fact: "What Bob says".
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    He is bleaching the print to open shadow areas or pop the highlight, what he isn't showing is that after doing that step its back to the fix, or the print will eventually be screwed.
    Why?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #7

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    Bleach..? Like Clorox bleach for laundry? I bet you have to do it fast and get it back into fixer as you mentioned.

    Todd

  8. #8
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
    Bleach..? Like Clorox bleach for laundry?
    No.

    http://jbhphoto.com/blog/2012/09/16/...ive-bleaching/

    video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3HuOspVwnU

  9. #9
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I thought the original post reference was using farmer's reducer which to me would make more sense, so I can see where the difference of opinion derives.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #10

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    WOW!! This is exciting!! I might have to try my hand with this.

    Todd

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