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Thread: GRRRRRRRR

  1. #1
    naaldvoerder's Avatar
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    GRRRRRRRR

    I guess you all know this.. Yesterday I made 3 lith-prints (lengthy pr0cedure) on Fotospeed Lith-paper (expensive). I toned them in Goldtoner (expensive, lengthy). Out of these 3, I selected 2 for mounting. As usual I sprayed the prints and the mounting board with Bison gluespray, got my rubber roller, flattened the prints on the very tsacky board and.... the prints both buckled and are now in my dustbin. !!!%$#@@ ..damned. Is this familiar or just me?.....

    JJ

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    garryl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by naaldvoerder
    the prints both buckled and are now in my dustbin. !!!%$#@@ ..damned. Is this familiar or just me?.....
    JJ
    I guess this means your not an archivist- spray glue?

    No matter what mounting method you use, things like this well/ are happening throughout the photo world.Continue to stomp around a little more, then start over.

    It's all
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  3. #3

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    I've been lucky enough to not have that exact problem. For anything that isn't RC I use two pieces of tape along the long edge of the print and placed in the corners to hold it onto the matte. The matte is then folded over and the matte and print could be turned (opened) much like the pages of a book.

    But, similar headaches of time and expense all ending up in the trash are quite common for me! I guess this is what makes me attach so much value to my work. The personal worth I feel to a piece that hangs on my wall never to leave my home, and the worth I attach to work that would go to a client.

    (Gotta love being awake at 3am trying to meet a deadline and realize youve only got 5 sheets of paper left and a negative thats very difficult to print!)
    "Where is beauty? Where I must will with my whole Will; where I will love and perish, that an image may not remain merely an image."

  4. #4
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    All the more reason to get a drymount press!
    Gary Beasley

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    I got a Seal 160M drymount press on ebay last week for $145. Have a look because there are more.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    Film photography? This term kills me. As if there's another kind!

  6. #6
    Sean's Avatar
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    agreed, for me a high end rotatrim and a decent drymount press are the way to go..

  7. #7
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    Even with the use of the glue, a dry mount press might cure the problem. The bubble probably came about because the stuff was not dry enough when the print was joined to the backing, and the vapors had no place to go. A trip through the mounting press might help, especially if a few pinloles were punched through the back just short of penetrating the print.
    Gadget Gainer

  8. #8

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    The third option is wet mounting. A wet mounted print is mounted wet with organic glue. The print is soaked in water, squegged on both side, the mounting board (mat board) is painted with the glue, the print place then rolled. Because the print is wet the bubbles can be rolled out. The trick is that you need to mount a scrap print on the back to keep the print from warping. Then let the print dry. Messy, but it does work.

    Paul

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    naaldvoerder's Avatar
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    Thanks guy's for your practical recommendations. The rage has past now.....

  10. #10

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    [QUOTE=naaldvoerder]I guess you all know this.. Yesterday I made 3 lith-prints (lengthy pr0cedure) ....

    I've never done any mounting other than heat dry mounting, which is trouble free, once you buy the necessary stuff and get the time/temp balance right. But - lately my gallery and framing friends tell me that any kind of mounting, at least in the markets I frequent (East Coast US), depreciates collectability, due to it's permanent nature. I'm told (and will be doing this for a show upcoming) to attach the prints (linen tape) to a support surface, then cut the matte to show 1/4" around the edge of the exposed image, then just lay the matte over, and frame. True, it's not as flat, but supposedly more preferred, for what it's worth. (All acid free materials, natch.)



 

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