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  1. #11
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Not quite.... you need two filters at a minimum. The hard (high contrast) emulsion reacts to blue light, the soft (low contrast) emulsion to green light. You use yellow filters to expose the soft emulsion (yellow subtracts, i.e. blocks, the blue from the enlarger light) and magenta filters to expose the hard emulsion (magenta subtracts green).

    In practice, filters are bought in packs of grade 00 to 5. Unless you want very large square filters, this is the simplest way to obtain them. If you can't packs for some reason, but can get individual filters, then 130 or more of yellow and 130 or more of magenta should get you going (based on the maximum yellow and magenta on my enlarger's colour head which I use for this method).

    You then vary the amount of hard/soft emulsion exposed by varying the amount of time the paper is exposed through each filter. Do a search here on APUG for "split grade" and "split filter"

    Cheers, Bob.

  2. #12

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    Thanks a lot, I think I got the idea.
    Actually the enlarger isn't meant to be used with any filters (any size), so it's not that important.
    And since I'm a total amateur, I don't need nor a set of 100 filters.
    Well, the situation is like this: the enlarger uses the same lenses as my old Zenit cameras (with the M39 or M42 thread).
    So, can I use the color filters that are used in the field when taking the pictures?
    They are glass filters, and I have got green, yelloy and blue ones.

  3. #13
    lee
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    Reinis,
    go to darkroomagic.com and under the "Book" heading you will find a listing for basic split grade filter printing. it is a .pdf file so you will need Adobe Acrobat and read all that and it should give you the answers for the questions you are asking.

    lee\c

  4. #14

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    Ok, thanks, I'll try that.

  5. #15
    ann
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    if you are attempting to do split printing check
    www. darkroomagic.com
    there is some information there that might help you

  6. #16
    ann
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    you don't need 100 filters.
    you need a basic box that contains a total of 12, starting with 00 and increases in 1/2 steps.
    You can't use the same filters for printing that you use for making pictures, even it the lens is the same as the camera lens.

    THe paper will not response to those filters, they need a special set that is made for controling and changing the contrast with the paper.

  7. #17
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reinis
    <snip>
    So, can I use the color filters that are used in the field when taking the pictures?
    They are glass filters, and I have got green, yelloy and blue ones.
    In a nutshell: probably not. They will probably be much too feint, allowing too many other wavelengths of light through. I take it that your enlarger does not have a colour head? If not, I'm afraid you will have to find some filters from somewhere and, if it does not have a filter drawer, you will also need an under-the-lens filter holder too...

    You still have the option to use graded paper but that will mean buying several different packs to cover grades 1 - 4. Or try grades 1, 3 and 5 to reduce costs, aiming to print on grade 3 for a "normal" negative. There are tricks you can do in the darkroom to get the intermediate grades, but frankly, as a beginner, use VC paper and get some proper filters - it will make your life so much easier. Only 6 or 12 filters in a pack, depending on maker (and if you use split-grade printing you only use the grade 00 and grade 5 ones).

    Good luck. Bob.
    Last edited by Bob F.; 04-13-2005 at 01:38 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelingn...

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    In actual fact though the filters sets sold for printing on VC paper are Yellow and Magenta. .
    Not red/orange?? Good thing I don't try and take colour pictures. Also a good thing the filters have those little numbers on them! :rolleyes:
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

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