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  1. #11
    rogueish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TPPhotog
    ... so I threw in 10ml of neat Rodinal ...
    WHAT! no ice!! Not even a little fancy umbrella?!

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    There are developers that are formulated specifically for both prints and film, sometimes with different dilutions. Look in your favorite book of formulas for "universal" developers, and they'll do what you want.

    Usually print developers are a lot more energetic than film developers. Prints might be a little flat in D-76. If you develop film in Dektol 1+2, developing time might be uncomfortably short, and contrast and grain might be higher than you want. On the other hand, if you were shooting on a short deadline for a newspaper in the 1940s, you might do just that (maybe even using hot Dektol) and print it wet, since it would be good enough for newsprint.

    Print developers also often have an antifoggant or restrainer to preserve a sparkling white base. With film developers, it is considered good practice to decrease the amount of any accelerants (like carbonate) before adding a restrainer to reduce base fog, and it's usually not as critical, since you can print through the base fog on a neg, but there's no reclaiming base fog on a print without adding a bleach step.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  3. #13
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    I have used HC110 with added carbonate. It's been a while, but I seem to remember using 1 oz to the quart plus a tablespoon of washing soda. It worked quite well. Nowadays, I use my PC-Glycol in about the same way. You may need some bromide as well. D-76 would probably work with added carbonate, but as mentioned it would be rather expensive. You don't need all that sulfite. If you use PC-Glycol, you won't have any sulfite.

    If you are using the D-76 as 1 shot, you could add carbonate to the used developer and use it for a batch of prints. I bet it would work.
    Gadget Gainer

  4. #14
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Well, if you talk about what you've used -- I've developed film in Dektol (about 35 years ago), IIRC 1+9 and no idea after all this time for how long, but it worked fine (at least for 620). I've also developed prints in HC-110 Dilution A; they took (as I recall, this has been around 30 years, also) a similar time to come up to Dektol, but had a curiously blue tone that would alter to a very brown color if exposed to white light while in the stop bath. Don't recall what paper this was, possibly Velox (I had Velox and Azo at the time, rescued from the trash, and I doubt I was making enlargements on Azo). I have some very old Velox now, waiting for my darkroom to be ready; I might have to try reproducing this result and then see if other papers react similarly.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by rogueish
    WHAT! no ice!! Not even a little fancy umbrella?!
    Those were in my glass

  6. #16
    rjr
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    Jon,

    it´s certainly not forbidden, but you´ll save nothing - the film developer will be exhausted pretty fast and it´s more expensive than most paper developers.

    But there is one appliance - film dev will give very soft prints, you can give it a try it with very contrasty (read: grossly messed up) negatives.
    Tschüss,
    Roman

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