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  1. #11

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    Oct 2004
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    Whatever.

    David.

  2. #12

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    May 2005
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    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
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    B/W prints from color negatives

    Quote Originally Posted by Neal
    Dear fotofox,

    In addition to Panalure, Kodak sells b&w paper that develops in RA-4 chemicals. Photocolor (marketed by Paterson) sells an easy to use room temperature kit that works nicely in trays. I've read that Kodak Flexicolor chemicals also work at room temperature, but I've never used them that way.

    As long as you don't mind working without a safelight (same for Panalure) there is no problem. I use examination gloves rather than print tongs when processing RA-4 to make it easier to find the print.

    Neal Wydra
    I have never tried B/W prints from colour negs but would like to try. However I am able to use RA4 paper for colour prints in a very good safelight called a DUKA 50.

    Is there something different in Panalure compared to say Kodak Supra Endura or Fuji Crystal Archive which prevents the use of a safelight. Working in total darkness is quite daunting and it would appear unnecessary unless, as I say, that Panalure is quite different from Fuji or Kodak RA4 paper.

    I would appreciate any comments on this. As a community we need to be sure that if we say total darkness is required then we are right. Otherwise we succeed in either putting off newcomers to this kind of printing or making life more difficult than it already is compared to our bretheren who do everything in photoshop.

    kn

  3. #13

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    I think Kodak do quote a safelight you can use with Panalure. I have never bothered though. It is amazing how easy it is to work in complete darkness once you get used to it. The secret is to have everything in a known place before you start. Panalure's emulsion side feels different to the paper face, so it is easy to make sure you have it the right way up on the enlarger and the easel makes sure you put it in the right place. It's really no harder than working with film in the dark.

    David.

  4. #14

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    Dec 2004
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    Dear kn,

    I would hate to put someone off working with RA-4 (or Panalure). I should have added that I find it very easy to work without a safelight. It is an inexpensive option, particularly if you don't plan on making a lot of prints on panchromatic paper. Check out the color printing section. There is a fellow there who is building his own safelight that is almost as inexpensive as not buying one at all.

    Neal Wydra

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