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  1. #1

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    B/W prints from color negatives

    This would require a filter, wouldn't it? Presumably, without a filter, the red parts of the negative would not register on the red-insensitive paper.

  2. #2
    ann
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    when printing color negatives to black and white materials is accomplished much easier if one use the Kodak panulure paper, which comes in grades.
    These papers must be exposed and developed in complete darkness.

    We have had people use traditional b&w papers with color negatives, with some success, or complete failure. The prints made with these materials have a somewhat different look; they tend to be gainy. There will be contrast issue and increased exposure will be needed.

    Have seen prints made with the traditional filters but usually because of the natural mask filters haven't been needed.

    It would be best to just test what will work for you, in your environment and with your equipment.

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    Have a look at the attached web site. Load the adobe file at the bottom and go to page 96 in the sample chapter of Ctein's Post Exposure book. This should answer any questions you have about Panalure or the use of any other process to get B&Wprints from color negs.

    http://ctein.com/booksmpl.htm

  4. #4

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    Dear fotofox,

    In addition to Panalure, Kodak sells b&w paper that develops in RA-4 chemicals. Photocolor (marketed by Paterson) sells an easy to use room temperature kit that works nicely in trays. I've read that Kodak Flexicolor chemicals also work at room temperature, but I've never used them that way.

    As long as you don't mind working without a safelight (same for Panalure) there is no problem. I use examination gloves rather than print tongs when processing RA-4 to make it easier to find the print.

    Neal Wydra

  5. #5

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    Panalure is wonderful stuff, although I now have to import it specially into the UK as Kodak don't sell it here any more. I think only the medium grade is still made. One of the beauties of it is that you can still use filters as you would with B&W film to darken skies etc, albeit everything obviously works backwards with a negative. As Neil says, you can't use a safelight, but you soon get used to that. Incidentally, if nothing else, it is very useful for contact printing colour film. Life really is too short to contact print in colour (except from LF obviously).

    David.

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    Eh? Colour contact prints are relatively simple. If you keep notes then just set the enlarger and timer to the normal settings for that film. Might not be perfect but good enough if you're just proofing a roll of film. Or you could make a print with an average negative on the roll and then use those settings for the contact print.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Eh? Colour contact prints are relatively simple. If you keep notes then just set the enlarger and timer to the normal settings for that film. Might not be perfect but good enough if you're just proofing a roll of film. Or you could make a print with an average negative on the roll and then use those settings for the contact print.
    Each to their own I guess. All I want the contacts for is film identification and am often doing batches of up to 50 films at once and the Panalure versions get done a lot faster. It just depends on what you want the contacts for.

    David.

  8. #8

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    I just don't see it. You're still exposing 50 sheets of paper. Processing? RA-4 is pretty quick. Sorry I just don't understand how you're saving time.

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    I guess probably because being a bit of a perfectionist, I wouldn't be happy in colour unless I had the colour balance just so. In B&W I only have to worry about exposure. OK, maybe a personal failing. As I say, each to their own.

    David.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft
    Incidentally, if nothing else, it is very useful for contact printing colour film. Life really is too short to contact print in colour (except from LF obviously).
    David.
    ??? I do RA4 contact sheets all the time.

    Enlarger M605 height 22", f4, Focus on blades, 4 second exposure. 45Y45M. Fuji Crystal Archive. Develop 60 sec Stop 30 sec Blix 60 secs. Wash 60 secs. Dry with hair dryer 60 sec :-)

    Done


    Patterson Printmaster RA4 chemistry @ 20C.

    Graham.

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