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  1. #11
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Split Printing can be done with flat, medium normal, and contrasty negatives. I print all my work with split printing unless I am using a graded paper then I use a split developer.
    Flat negs in fact , benifit from split printing for some of the reasons stated above.
    When do you split print??? Any damm time you feel like it I would say.
    Spent all day today split printing various negatives and each image recieved a different treatment.

  2. #12
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Hi Lee
    I just went back to your post and noticed you are using Lee filters . Wow I absolutely never thought of this and just now my brain in churning.
    How about making a test print size as final. mounting the print onto thin black card stock then cutting out areas to lower /increase contrast and burning in the areas with the filters cut out and placed on the holes in the card .
    you could have multile burn areas in very concentrated areas.Maybe I have spent to long in the darkroom today, better go home and sleep on it.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie
    Hi Lee
    I just went back to your post and noticed you are using Lee filters . Wow I absolutely never thought of this and just now my brain in churning.
    How about making a test print size as final. mounting the print onto thin black card stock then cutting out areas to lower /increase contrast and burning in the areas with the filters cut out and placed on the holes in the card .
    you could have multile burn areas in very concentrated areas.Maybe I have spent to long in the darkroom today, better go home and sleep on it.
    Lee was kind enough to send me home with a below the lens filter holder and a green and blue filter last weekend. Did some prints yesterday using them and have to say, I prefer using the green/blue filters over the dichro head. First of all it was much easier to change the soft/hard filters and the results were much more to my vision...heck once the StopClock gets here, the process will be so simplified, I will probably try printing most of my negatives split print for no other reason than it will be at least as easy as running a test strip anyhow.

    I would say the green/blue filters are as good a way as any..and you may have a point Bob, using the filters over the cout out may be an excellent way to burn in areas....hmmmmmmmmmmm...might have to give it a try.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  4. #14
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    Well, I have to say that my life in the darkroom got just light years easier after taking Les' workshop! I gues I fall into the category of using split-grade printing AND f-stop timing as my first option for all my prints. Now, once I run a print, I may discover that the #0, #5 combo is not quite right for a particular negative, but it gives me information to start from and then I can make decisions from there.

    I can't hardly wait to get my Stop Clock Pro, either, Mike! I'm so darned excited! I have an analog timer, and I'm afraid I'm wearing it out with all that twisting and turning! However, my 'on-the-fly' math skills are sharp as a tack!

    But I guess in answer to the original question... split-printing always the first time for any negative is what works for me.
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  5. #15
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    My own opinion is that split grade works best with images that contain broad areas of detailed shadows as well as significant, important highlight areas. Almost like two separate images of equal importance within the same frame. To create distinct tonal separation in the shadow areas with a solid dmax while also having a proper contrast within the broad lighter areas.
    This would be an example though much deep shadow detail is lost in the scan:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mill1.jpg  
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    My own opinion is that split grade works best with images that contain broad areas of detailed shadows as well as significant, important highlight areas. Almost like two separate images of equal importance within the same frame. To create distinct tonal separation in the shadow areas with a solid dmax while also having a proper contrast within the broad lighter areas.
    This would be an example though much deep shadow detail is lost in the scan:

    The scan is very nice...I assume that the print is stunning...

  7. #17
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Ok Folks , I have slept on it and here is an idea to try with the Lee filters . It is based on an old concept of pyramid or concentrict sp ring dodging.

    If you are mechanically inclined do it yourself or if you are like me 10 thumbs get some one to do it.

    Mount a bracket on the side of the enlarger head that travels up and down when you change sizes. to this bracket attach a swinging arm that will bring in the arm under the lens (lets say 12-15 inches) On this arm have an holder that you can lay a sheet of clear glass (optically clean as possible)
    Make a print any damm way you would like split, straight you name it.(We will be using VC papers to make this idea work.
    Make your print and look into all the areas of the image.
    You could cut out the filters into the shape of the area you want to dodge with a different contrast than your main filter packs. ( they come in very large sheets from Lee Filters , I think about $6 each) by selecting filters of higher or lower contrast you could Isolate small areas within the print and also use gells or other tissues to create areas of softness and sharpness in the print.
    Now if the mechanic setting this up could make the swinging arm *snap* into position you could then have two arms, one on each side of the enlarger, one for dodging and one for burning in .

    OK .. I WILL STATE HERE IF ANYONE PATENTS THIS DEVICE BEFORE I DO (ITS HOLIDAY MONDAY HERE IN CANADA) I WILL SUE YOUR ASS.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie

    OK .. I WILL STATE HERE IF ANYONE PATENTS THIS DEVICE BEFORE I DO (ITS HOLIDAY MONDAY HERE IN CANADA) I WILL SUE YOUR ASS.
    Hmmm...I suppose that you propose to sell this invention, on which I had filed a US patent pending eons ago by the way, for less then I had intended...I figured that it was worth at least $450.00 in quantities of three up...

    I am calling my attorney now...by the way what is your address?

  9. #19
    titrisol's Avatar
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    I split print for 8x10s and larger prints only, when I feel the straight print +D/B lacks "punch"
    Mama took my APX away.....

  10. #20

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    Actually you can split print everything. Many people have noted that negatives that are contrastier than normal are "good canidates" for split printing. However any negative can be split print once one understands the relationship between the two exposures.

    Many printers use the following method to find the times for split grade printing:

    1) Make a set of test strips with just the #0 filter. Find the time that provides perfect highlight detail.

    2) Expose an entire sheet with #0 filter for the time found in step 1.

    3) Make test strips on the sheet exposed in step 2 with the #5 filter to find the perfect time to generate proper shadow detail.

    Because the #5 filter exposure does not change highlights very much this method works well. More importanly it works very well when the #5 exposure is short which is what a higher than normal contrast negative will give you. Thus making the repuation that higher than normal contrast negatives are best for split grade printing.

    It should be noted that when the negative is less than normal contrast the #5 filter time is larger, and since it does affect the highlights some, tends to muddy the highlights. Printers often get discuraged at this point and give up on split grade printing with a low contrast negative.

    However once one understands how the two times interact it is possible to print low contrast negatives just as easily as high contrast negatives.

    From expermentation I have found the following rules:

    For every five seconds increase in the #5 filter subtract one second from the time used with the #0 filter in order to keep the highlight detail the same.

    For every three seconds increase in the #0 filter subtract one second from the time used with the #5 filter in order to keep the shadow detail the same.

    For example:

    Suppose the test strips for the highlights showed that the perfect time was 15 seconds. Then the entire sheet was exposed for 15 seconds with the #0 filter and test strips where perfomred with the #5 filter. It was found that proper shadow detail was generated with 20 seconds of exposure with the #5 filter. However the highlights suffered and became muddy! But using the rules above the highlights can be recovered by decreasing the #0 exposure time by 4 seconds (4=20/5). Thus an exposure of 11 seconds with the #0 filter, and 20 seconds with the #5 filter generates a nice print. (if you followed closely you would have also spotted that the #5 exposure time should have been adjusted to 18.66 seconds because decreasing the #0 time should effect the #5 time to achieve perfect shadow detail, however the difference between 18.66 seconds and 20 seconds is pretty small).

    Using these two rules it is possible to tweek the print, burn and dodge the print to obtain more control than single grade printing.

    Ken

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