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Thread: drydown

  1. #21
    KenM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hortense
    Here’s what John Sexton does – and, what I do:
    ...
    Bruce Barnbaum must do something like this since has and several articles, “There is no such thing as dry-down.” While we all now that dry-down effect print emulsions, this is a faster way of getting to the final print.
    Yes, you're correct, he does. However, instead of measuring anything, Bruce adjusted his lighting based on his prints. After a few iterations, he was done.

    So, if your prints are too dark when you look at them under normal room lighting (after they're dried and/or mounted) your inspection light in the darkroom is to bright. Likewise, if your prints are too light, your inspection light is too dim.

    Lather, rinse, repeat until you're satisfied with the final product.
    Cheers!

    -klm.

  2. #22
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon
    I always understood drydown to be due to the swell of the wet emulsion causing silver particles to seperate and appear less dense - as it dries, the emulsion shrinks and the particles draw closer, and hence the tones darken. How can increasing development times alter a physical characteristic of the emulsion/paper?
    I think you are correct Leon, it cannot. Wet paper and emulsion expands, so the image appears lighter. It shrinks back to it's original size as it dries, and thereby gets a little darker. Wet prints obviously have a different look to dry ones, which further complicates matters. Les has an article on the subject on this site which is worth a read.
    All seems like a good reason to print on R/C to me; sniff!
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  3. #23
    dphphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon
    I always understood drydown to be due to the swell of the wet emulsion causing silver particles to seperate and appear less dense - as it dries, the emulsion shrinks and the particles draw closer, and hence the tones darken. How can increasing development times alter a physical characteristic of the emulsion/paper?
    I don't know, but it seems to work.
    dphphoto

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