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  1. #11
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Using your example and Donald's formula (which is the correct way to calculate this):

    TO = 30 seconds
    LO = 5 inches
    LN = 8 inches

    LN/LO = 1.6

    (LN/LO)^2 = 2.56

    TN = 30 seconds *2.56 = 76.8 seconds

    With some papers and large jumps in exposure length, you may need to add more time for reciprocity failure. Or you can also compensate with aperture if you have some room to breathe there.

    Lee

  2. #12
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    Thanks Lee and Donald. It makes perfect sense once I recognized the format of the equasion.. it IS bellows extention... only we are IN the "bellows" (i.e. darkroom)

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomassauerwein
    Other than instinct and testing, I've found this Ilford tool really handy. It is an enlrger light meter of sorts called an EM10. really cheap and very accurate. You can measure a highlight then enlarge then re-set to the same spot, and finaly adjust the f-stop till you have the same exposure.
    What does this ilford tool look like? I bought all my darkroom kit on ebay as a job lot and there is this Ilford thing with a dial and little lights that light up as you turn it. It is white and about 4" long by 1.5" wide.

    Mabey this is the thing!!

  4. #14
    Ole
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    That's it, Matt!

    If you have the manual for it, throw it away. Then search APUG for advice on how to use it
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #15
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt5791
    What does this ilford tool look like? I bought all my darkroom kit on ebay as a job lot and there is this Ilford thing with a dial and little lights that light up as you turn it. It is white and about 4" long by 1.5" wide.

    Mabey this is the thing!!
    Sounds like the Ilford EM-10 (EM =enlarging meter?). See this thread:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum41/4990-ilford-em10-first-impressions.html
    on how some people use it.

    Search Ilford EM-10 in google to see some photos. I think there were a couple of versions over the years. I use a Beseler Analite 500 occasionally, which is essentially the same in function.

    Lee

  6. #16

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    Good Afternoon, Matt,

    Assuming that your enlarger has a scale along one standard, along with an indicator giving the distance of the head above the baseboard, the following formula should work well in most cases.

    New Distance/Original Distance (Squared), Multiplied by Original Printing Time = New Printing Time.

    Example: Original Print Exposure--5 seconds with Enlarger head at 13 inches.
    Next Print with the enlarger head at 26 inches.

    26/13 = 2; 2 squared = 4; 4 x 5 seconds(OT) = 20 seconds for the new larger print, assuming, of course, no change in f-stop. It's just an illustration that light falls off as the square of the distance.

    This is, if I understand correctly, essentially the same idea as Donald and Lee L have described; it just uses enlarger head height instead of print length as the measurement. Since my Beseler MCR-X has a scale on the right-hand standard, it's the most convenient way for me.

    Konical

  7. #17

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    Noah,

    Note that JohnnyWalker was correct and that his method is equivalent. In his example, TO = 20sec, LO = 4in, LN = 8in therefore TN = 20*2^2 or 80 seconds, which is 4 times the original time. This is, of course, because (LN/LO)^2 = LN^2/LO^2.

  8. #18
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Konical
    Good Afternoon, Matt,
    This is, if I understand correctly, essentially the same idea as Donald and Lee L have described; it just uses enlarger head height instead of print length as the measurement. Since my Beseler MCR-X has a scale on the right-hand standard, it's the most convenient way for me.

    Konical
    That's it exactly. The change in height of the enlarger is directly proportional to the change in width of the print, so percentage change in enlarger height (new height/old height) would result in the same number as LN/LO, so you square that and multiply the original exposure time by that number.

    Lee

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmmichel
    Noah,

    Note that JohnnyWalker was correct and that his method is equivalent. In his example, TO = 20sec, LO = 4in, LN = 8in therefore TN = 20*2^2 or 80 seconds, which is 4 times the original time. This is, of course, because (LN/LO)^2 = LN^2/LO^2.
    Just to be clear on precedence of operations for the sake of those like me, who are 30 years past algebra classes or otherwise out of practice:

    TN = 20*(2^2) or 80 seconds, which is correct

    (as opposed to TN = (20*2)^2 or 1600 seconds, which is incorrect.)

    Lee

  10. #20

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    Exposure follows the "square law" vs distance. (i.e. Divide the new distance from lens to paper by the old distance, then square the result, then multiply the old exposure time by that to get the new time.) If you double the distance between the lens and the paper, you must quadruple the exposure. You will have to make a test exposure at the new time and distance, since papers suffer noticeably from reciprocity failure.

    The easy way to handle this, as noted above, is to use a meter. Take a reading in a key area (preferably about zone VI in the print), then change the enlargement size, read the same area again, and adjust the aperture until you get the same light level as before.

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