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  1. #1
    JeffD's Avatar
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    RH Designs Stopclock Pro - Dodging question

    I am having a bit of hard time figuring this out.

    I have a print that mostly looks correct at an exposure of 19.5 seconds, however, 4 or 5 relatively small areas that need a 1/3 stop dodge each.


    I want to program these 5 dodges in as steps, as the dodges are in different areas of the print, and I'd like to use different dodging tools.

    I have read and re-read the manual, but I am unsure of how to program this in as "steps" in the device.

    Setting up additional burn in steps, over and above a base exposure, is easy, but I can't get my head around how to do multiple dodges, each of which wind up being 1/3 less exposure than my "base" 19.5 second exposure.

    Anyone?

  2. #2

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    Here's a couple ways of doing it. First, turn on the one second clicks. Next, program in your standard time. Figure out how many seconds you need to dodge each area, let's say it's 4 seconds each. Lay out your dodge tools. Get the first one ready. Start time. Dodge area one for 4 click. Pick up second dodge tool and dodge for 4 clicks. Finally do the last one.

    Another way would be to set the time at 7.5 seconds. Then set the steps at 4 seconds, or close. So exposure 0 (the base exposure) would be 7.5 seconds. Exposure 1 would be 4 seconds, exposrue 2 would be 4 seconds, and exposure 3 would be 4 seconds, all with the appropriate dodgeing taking place.

  3. #3
    JeffD's Avatar
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    I am still confused, but thanks for attempting to help me!

    Sounds like you were considering only three dodges, but what happens if there are, say 5?

    I know each of the 5 sections needs a 1/3 deduction from 19.5 seconds, which I know is correct
    for the bulk of the print

    1/3 of a stop off the 19.5 seconds is, I believe 4 seconds.

    Sounds like your second solution is to to a much reduced base exposure, followed by multiple
    small exposures, each of which dodges the corresponding portion of the print.

    How would I calculate the initial base exposure? Assuming I could, isn't it impossible to do 5 more
    exposures which are essentially 5 exposures dodging the five individual areas for 4 seconds?

    This is making my head swim. I am missing something obvious. Maybe this can't be done
    with any accuracy!

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffD

    Sounds like you were considering only three dodges, but what happens if there are, say 5?
    It all depends on what's easiest. There are various things you can do.

    First, since dodging part A is equivalent to burning everything but A, you could see if thinking about making a series of burns makes it easier. In other words first find the shortest time that gives any part of the print the density that you want. That's your base time. Then use test prints/strips to see what the total time is required to get the density you want on the various other parts of the print, and then divy exposures up to get that amount.

    Second, you can make a custom dodge (or burn) tool that'll do multiple areas at once. For example, I have a frame across which I can put very thin fishing line. I then you tape and opaque pieces of whatever to make a custom dodging frame.

    Third, you can use pencil/ink/acetate masks that you put on top of the negative.

    Fourth, you can consider flashing.

    Fifth, you can consider bleaching.

    I hope that this is helpful. I've had a long day.

    G'night.

  5. #5
    JeffD's Avatar
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    I think I just figured it out. 5 exposures, of 4 seconds, each exposure dodging one of the 5 sections that I need a 1/3 stop reduction.

    I must be tired. I made this more difficult than it had to be!

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    Thanks for those posts, Peter. The idea about the frame with fishing line seems like an interesting idea I'd like to try.

    multiple burns of dodges is a real pain- I'm surprised I don't read more threads with tips or tricks.

    When I have to dodge, say for only a few seconds, and i am doing multiple exposures, I always have a hard time accurately prepositioning my dodging or burning devices, so that the proper area is covered or uncovered. Seems like I usually waste a second or two getting in the proper position, which kind of bothers me.

    Anyway, my 5 dodge print is now happily washing! Thanks!

  7. #7

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    Yes, multiple dodges/burns can be a pain. Here's something you might try. Make sure to have the 1 second clicks turned on. Then suppose you have to dodge/burn a very intricate area. Add a few seconds to that step. When you get to that step, cover the whole easel. Hit expose and position your dodging/burning tool. After the appropriate amount of click, take the card covering the whole easel away while keeping the dodging/burning tool in place. That outta help getting in the ball park.

    I admit that this is a weakness with the RH timer. With my old method I could repeat any step of the exposure sequence multiple times. For example, suppose step 3 was 4 seconds. I could put a red filter under the enlarger, or put a card over the easel, and give the four second exposure. During that time, I could position the dodge/burn tool, as no light was reaching the easel. After the enlarger switched off, I'd remove the card and hit the footswitch again with the dodge/burn tool in the right place.

    One thing to remember is that it's easier to do intricate dodges/burns when the exposure is longer. You can stop down, or, if that's a problem, add some neutral density to the filtration (or a neutral desnity filter above the negative). Alternatively, you could switch to a slower paper for really tough negatives.

    I also wish that one could save more than 20 steps with the RH timer. (You can save 10 steps in each of the two channels.) I've occasionally run into images that required more steps.

  8. #8
    RH Designs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter De Smidt
    I admit that this is a weakness with the RH timer. With my old method I could repeat any step of the exposure sequence multiple times.
    Actually, you can repeat a step as often as you like, although it's not quite as convenient as programming a sequence. While you're in programme mode, simply press the Start key and the currently programmed step will be timed - as many times as you want.

    So for example if there are five areas of a print which all require a 1/3 stop burn, make the base exposure, then press Store and set the first programme step to 1/3 stop. Press Start and the timer will give you a 1/3 stop burn for area 1. Press Start again for area 2 and so on.

    That way you can have as many exposures as you like, but you can't store them as an executable sequence.

    Hope that helps!

    Regards
    Richard

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffD
    5 exposures, of 4 seconds, each exposure dodging one of the 5 sections that I need a 1/3 stop reduction.
    That works. But it does force you to juggle a bit while printing. And if you have more areas requiring dodging, you have a problem.

    There is another trick that can be useful when you have multiple areas requiring dodging, or when these areas are small. It's called dye dodging.

    Take a piece of scap film - undeveloped, but fixed to the clear base and thoroughly washed and dried. Tape this to the non-emulsion side of the negative you are working on. The, using magnifiers and a small brush (a spotting brush is perfect), apply a dye to the scrap film over the areas that require dodging.

    You can use ordinary spotting dyes, but I prefer to use a colored dye instead. Using a magenta dye gives the effect of a localized dodge while also providing a slight increase in local contrast. A yellow dye gives a low contrast dodge. I use Dr. Martin's watercolor dyes.

    You could apply the dyes directly to the back of the negative, but using the scrap film makes the process totally reversable (just remove the dyed sheet of film), and the fact that the dye layer is separated from the negative emulsion by two layers of film base means that the edges of the dye spots wont be in sharp focus.



 

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