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  1. #11

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    Can I take it that you mean the RH Designs Analyser Pro can be bought for half the price of the Splitgrade(Heiland Electronic)? So, if my assumption is correct then a Splitgrade is almost £500. What does it do better than the RH designs that justifies twice the price.

    Not looking to start an argument about the two machines. Just curious about its advantages. For double the price it would be reasonable to assume that these advantages have to be considerable.

    Pentaxuser

  2. #12

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    Hi
    I use an RHdesigns Zonemaster II in combination with the RHD Stopclock Vario, this timer is designed to vary the timing to compensate for fluctuations in light output from all enlarger lightsources including cold cathode, the head I have been using it with is an old De Vere 10"X8" Cathomag with impressive results.

  3. #13
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    FYI

    Aristo coldlights do have an additional heater above the light chamber. Aristo calls it the thermo and there is a separate cord with which to plug in. There is some temperature control there, too. If one measures the light output versus temperature, you will notice as the temperature increases, the light output increases to some maximum at which point the light output will decrease with temperature. It is at this point that one hopes the light chamber's temperature is regulated. Of course, turning on the lamp will heat the lamp, too. I believe this increase in light output with temperature is dominated by the phosphor temperature, as I've cooled spots on my tube with canned air, and there forms a little dim spot. ( Don't do this yourself as you could crack the tube. )

    Small differences in print exposures can be noticed in productions runs especially, but also in single prints in critical highlights. As highlights in prints get very little exposure above threshold, the slightest change in overall exposure can move the highlight exposure above or below threshold.

    If you use a coldlight, you pretty much have to have a light integrator or stabilizer. Personally, I use a MetroLux and expusure are perfectly repeatable, even when the exposure is broken into many pieces, as MetroLux includes the decay light (after the lamp is turned off) in the exposure.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  4. #14
    RH Designs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser
    Can I take it that you mean the RH Designs Analyser Pro can be bought for half the price of the Splitgrade(Heiland Electronic)? So, if my assumption is correct then a Splitgrade is almost £500. What does it do better than the RH designs that justifies twice the price.
    Pentaxuser
    The SplitGrade is more automated. It uses a motorised filter module with Heiland's own filters, so as a result the need for calibration is minimised because the filter and enlarger characteristics are known. It's a great machine for churning out good quality prints with minimal hassle, but the Analyser offers more flexibility and insight into the negative. It's like the difference between an automatic camera (Heiland) and a hand-held spot meter (RH). Convenience vs control! The higher level of automation contributes to the cost difference.

    We sell the Heiland product alongside the Analyser and ZoneMaster - our FAQ has more info about the differences. www.rhdesigns.co.uk/darkroom/html/faq1.html

    Regards
    Richard

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by RH Designs
    The SplitGrade is more automated. It uses a motorised filter module with Heiland's own filters, so as a result the need for calibration is minimised because the filter and enlarger characteristics are known. It's a great machine for churning out good quality prints with minimal hassle, but the Analyser offers more flexibility and insight into the negative. It's like the difference between an automatic camera (Heiland) and a hand-held spot meter (RH). Convenience vs control! The higher level of automation contributes to the cost difference.

    We sell the Heiland product alongside the Analyser and ZoneMaster - our FAQ has more info about the differences. www.rhdesigns.co.uk/darkroom/html/faq1.html

    Regards
    Richard
    Thanks. From what you've said it's either extra automation at double the price or extra hands-on work on the part of the RH Designs Analyser Pro's owner to achieve at least the same outcome or possibly better if you know what you are doing. It would have to be a lot of extra work involved to justify paying an extra £250 and that's setting aside for a moment the benefit of the additional control that the RH can give you.

    Pentaxuser

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser
    It would have to be a lot of extra work involved to justify paying an extra £250 and that's setting aside for a moment the benefit of the additional control that the RH can give you.
    In most cases it's quite a lot more than £250, that's for the controller alone. And there's no grey scale display on the SplitGrade unless you add the Comfort Interface, another £199. However, the SplitGrade is virtually a "plug and play" device whereas the Analyser may need some calibration to match your equipment and materials.
    If you use Ilford MG IV RC paper, Ilford filters and a tungsten-illuminated enlarger the Analyser's built-in settings should be fairly close to being correct.
    Regards
    Richard

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