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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Discovering split-grade printing last year helped me a lot in improving my skills, but not so long ago, I starded f-stop printing... it's logical and saves me a lot of paper!

    I as myself why I did not start f-stop printing before! Now find myself a decent f-stop clock. I am now dialing in the times manually on my old timers.

    G

  2. #12
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Oct 2002
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    Northern England on the Scottish border
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    [QUOTE=BWGirl]..... and I really find that split filter (#0 & #5) printing gives tons of control. There was something Les said that no one has mentioned so far... 'a little bit of #0 goes a long way' or something to that effect.

    In 15 years teaching the 0 and 5 method of split grade printing I have consistently seen people base the selection of the grade 0 exposure on the contrast they see in the test strip instead of selecting to exposure that simple gives the most delicate HIGHLIGHT TONE. Hence the slogan That Jeanette mentioned "a little soft filtration goes a long way". The contrast is generated by the addition of the grade 5 exposure. I have no doubt in my mind that with a suitable negative, this method of split grade printing will save both time and materials in the darkroom.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  3. #13
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Apr 2003
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    Another 0 and 5 practitioner here, following Les's method in my own thumb-fingered way! As Les says, the G0 exposure places the palest detailed highlight tone where you want it, the G5 exposure places the deepest detailed shadow tone where you want it. These may be just off paper-base and DMAX, or you may choose to place them elsewhere.

    I used to guestimate a grade, do a test strip for time and then fumble towards the correct settings by trial and error. Sometimes it would come quickly and other times it prove prove annoyingly elusive.

    Now, two test strips and that's my base exposure pretty much in the bag with just dodging and burning to worry about ("just" he says; Hah! :rolleyes: ).

    At first glance it seems like a slower and more complex way of working, but I have to say that the reverse usually proves to be the case.

    All the best with your endeavours!

    Frank
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

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