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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Koch
    BTW, it is very difficult to over-develop a print. The reason for this is that prints are developed to completion and after they are correctly developed there is little change in density or contrast even when the print is left for an extended period.

    I wouldn't agree with this statement. Try to develop few unexposed pieces of paper, initially marking them 1,2,3,4 and 5 and develop them with same time in minutes as they are marked, then stop, fix and completely dry them. Accordingly to conditions you've described above (paper, developer, temperature etc) you'll notice changes in tone probably between 3 and 4 or possibly between 4 and 5 minutes. This happens when exceed maximum developing time and on print it will look like a lack of contrast and fogging

    Overdeveloping is the enemy of the contrast. If there is already lack of contrast then you'll make it worse even if overdeveloping changes it very slightly

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hlop
    I wouldn't agree with this statement. Try to develop few unexposed pieces of paper, initially marking them 1,2,3,4 and 5 and develop them with same time in minutes as they are marked, then stop, fix and completely dry them. Accordingly to conditions you've described above (paper, developer, temperature etc) you'll notice changes in tone probably between 3 and 4 or possibly between 4 and 5 minutes. This happens when exceed maximum developing time and on print it will look like a lack of contrast and fogging

    Overdeveloping is the enemy of the contrast. If there is already lack of contrast then you'll make it worse even if overdeveloping changes it very slightly
    Developing blank paper is not the same as developing a print. It will not behave the same way because it has not been exposed. Increasing the development time will increase contrast up to a point and then begin to lower it due to overall fog formation. However, one would not usually leave the print for that long. There is a point where a print may appear done when it still needs a bit more time. That is what I was referring to.

    More prints are spoiled from being pulled too soon than from being left too long, particular by inexperienced printers. You shouldn't watch the clock when developing a print but watch the print.

  3. #43

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    So what's the verdict on the negs? I'm just dying to know...

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by elpuri
    So what's the verdict on the negs? I'm just dying to know...
    Me too No feedback from Donald Miller yet

  5. #45
    Area51Resident's Avatar
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    I just read this thread and am facinated to know the outcome.

    Was a cause/solution ever found?

    Thanks,

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hlop
    Me too No feedback from Donald Miller yet
    I am still waiting for your negatives.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  7. #47

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    This is a truly strange case. This new subscriber joins in late March this year. His actual threads seem to be 3, all launched within a week or two of joining and the vast bulk of his posts are connected to this thread. Despite a lot of help from many sources we collectively are unable to resolve his probem. He then leaves for Europe but expects to be back in late April. So presumably he has been back for say over 2 months and has not followed up on Don's kind offer. Has he found the solution? If so we'd all like to know what it was. Has he left APUG, changed his mind about a return to darkroom printing or what else?

    In every who or what dunnit the author should unmask the villain of the piece. Until then the Marie Celeste sails on and remains a mystery.

    I used to forget to put the filters back into the light path in the dichroic head with the white light lever quite often after focusing and deciding on the contrast grade. Did anybody mention this as a possible cause?

    Couldn't be as simple as that, could it?

    pentaxuser

  8. #48

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    I well remember that I've experienced a complete contrast loss on Ilford Multigrade III paper - well, after it's been well past its expiry date Maybe thanks to some developers included in sensitive layer, or maybe something else, it stopped to react to magenta filtration at all, giving me always 00 grade. As a result, the whole 100 sheet box of paper was trashed - fortunately it was just a 9*12cm format Maybe the paper is dead in this case? Just a guess.

    Cheers,
    Zhenya

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