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  1. #31
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Nov 2004
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    Grand Rapids
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    I put up a set wall paneled with that wonderful 80's fake pine paneling in the second bedroom of our apartment. It's 4ft x11ft and has a 7ft sink with hot &cold from the access panel to the bathtub plumbing in the next room. No drain though, i was scared of tapping into the 100 year old brass pipe.
    vinny
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    Check out my low volume sheet film tanks.

  2. #32
    titrisol's Avatar
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    Aug 2004
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    Used to be in the basement, now it is rolling cart in/out the bathroom.
    Bfeore that the bathroom in my mom;s house. Old bathrooms used to be HUGE!!!
    Mama took my APX away.....

  3. #33
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the answers folks. I too used to run between bedroom and bathroom, but it's so time consuming and things like that annoy me!

    I like the cart idea, but is this wise? Does your enlarger not get knocked out of alignment? I'm using a "flimsy Omega C760"

  4. #34

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    Jan 2006
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    1. A spare bedroom (AKA: The Lion's Den), I roar when someone enters this room. This is where I do most of the enlarging and cursing at night.

    2. The closet. I know exactly what goes on in there, while everyone else is curious. Thus I can load tanks and finish film processing during the day.

    3. The garage. I shoot during the day and play with chemicals in the garage at night. This keeps the chems away from the family.

    I transport my exposed paper in a black vinyl pouch from the den to the garage. I get my exercise and also pick up snacks in the kitchen during the trip.

  5. #35
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    Feb 2003
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    Prato- Tuscany - Italy
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    My darkroom is in my garage.....a good place where to put chemicals(it's safe enough)....and a good place where spend time on my prints.....
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

  6. #36
    markinlondon's Avatar
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    Aug 2004
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    Raumati, NZ
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    Mine is in what Sylvia calls "the utility room". I have to move the cat's litter tray when I want to print, it's 1.5m by 1.2m, there's no water supply except to the washing machine and it's hopeless in daylight, but it serves.

    Mark

  7. #37

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    Jan 2005
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    One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
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    My darkroom is in our laundry room. It has running water, a basin and a good-sized flat space for either of my two enlargers. Developing trays and/or developing drum I stick on top of the washer and dryer. I normally do darkroom work in the evening, when we're not doing laundry, so no conflict there. So far it's worked out well.

    Jim Bielecki

  8. #38
    Lopaka's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Jim Chinn Worst part is the darkroom is the last room to get finished.[/QUOTE]

    Yeah, my wife figured that if the darkroom got done before the rest of the basement, nothing else would get done. She was probably right.

    After a long anxious process, I finally have a permanent darkroom in the basement (originally laid out by the builder as optional laundry room) since there is a first floor laundry that made it perfect. The room adjacent is the 'light'room for finishing (mounting, etc).

    Ok - breaks over - back into the darkroom

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  9. #39

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    Apr 2004
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    There was a small dressing room connected to a small bathroom that I converted into a darkroom when we bought our home. It has a floor-to-ceiling row of shelves, built-in chest with drawers and a built-in cabinet above the chest. I fit a sheet of plywood over some filing cabinets to hold the processing trays and I cut another sheet to fit over the chest to hold the enlarger. The area is tight but workable. The bathroom shower holds the print washer. I do my film processing in the kitchen.

  10. #40
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
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    Windowless bathroom for enlarger and new (to me) print developing tubes. I also load my film developing tanks there.

    The enlarger sits on a sturdy stainless steel cart with wheels. When not in use, it is rolled out to a low use hallway.

    There is room on the cart for bins with lids, to hold timer, safelight, chemistry, paper, etc.

    I also have a (too small) dedicated cupboard in the bathroom, and a shelf in a cupboard near where the enlarger (an older Beseler 67C, with the single large column) spends its time.

    Developing happens in the light in the kitchen. I miss the experience of the image appearing in the tray, but there is one consolation - I've never had a darkroom before that had a nice view before

    Matt

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