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Thread: BIG prints

  1. #11

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    Hey, that's a UP 4-8-8-4 , isn't it? Love those things

  2. #12
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    I know that this takes the discussion a little off topic , but...
    There is a new company creating lighting for sets using LEDs and they come in 1'x1' panels. and I belive they run at 5600k. anyone looking to create a custom enlarger of their own might be able to use them. here's their web site http://www.litepanels.com/

  3. #13
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommy5c
    I know that this takes the discussion a little off topic , but...
    There is a new company creating lighting for sets using LEDs and they come in 1'x1' panels. and I belive they run at 5600k. anyone looking to create a custom enlarger of their own might be able to use them. here's their web site http://www.litepanels.com/
    Wow, for the price I can buy a good used 10x10 enlarger complete. It'd be good for converting a process camera into a ULF enlarger when banked in a 2x2 array.
    Gary Beasley

  4. #14
    tommy5c's Avatar
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    I didn't say it was a cheap way, but they are low temp and when looking at 11x14 or 12x20 maybe it's worth it. they will come down in price in the next 6mos. I'm not an advocate, but just thought they would be better than DIY

  5. #15

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    Take a look at Clyde Butcher's web site: http://www.clydebutcher.com/

    Clyde has been printing 5'x7' and larger for years now. You just need an enlarger that weighs a ton, literally. It is amazing to see a print so large that you feel like you are standing in it.

  6. #16

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    Well, I have an 8x10 De Vere mural enlarger in the basement, but so far I've only enlarged to 16x20, which looks pretty big since I've stuck to 8x10 prints for years. Conceivably I could do a 5 ft by 6 ft picture, which would be fun, but the cost of mural sized paper is not for the monetarily challenged, like me. Maybe someday.

  7. #17

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    I don't think that these present a viable source for large format (8X10 and larger) enlargers. The light output is too small for one thing and for another they would only work on graded materials unless one used printing filters even if the output were adequate. Printing filters would further diminish the light output.

    Most enlargers of that size have 1000 watt minimum and more likely 2000 watt lamps for the 8X10's...11X14 and 16X20 enlargers will be up in the 5000 watt size.

    That model in the illustration would not be holding the panel that near her if it were 1000 watts. I know because I have 1000 watts installed in my 5X7 enlarger. You do not want to look at it...
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  8. #18

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    While it is true you need lots of light to make big enlargements, that doesn't mean you need 1KW lamps. Unfortunately, the wavelengths of light needed for printing on multigrade paper just happen to be those least efficiently produced in a filament lamp. Since this print was made on Ilford MGIVRC paper (easy to find rolls on ePay) you can refer to the document at http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...0201152306.pdf to see the effect of color on print contrast for this paper. Incandescent lamps are poor generators of blue and green light. While you may well need 1KW to efficently enlarge using an incandescent bulb, the majority of the light available is being absorbed by your filtering. By using blue and green LEDs, Bob's enlarger is able to produce the needed light flux much more efficently, and since the colors are what you want, there is no need for additional filtration.

    For the print shown in my first post, the exposure was 100 seconds using a 300mm el-Nikkor lens at f16. Pretty reasonable exposure time. Each color of light in his enlarger is dissipating 50W of power, or 1/10 of what is traditionally used. It works because the wavelengths of light being produced in the light head are those that are needed by the paper. His setup gives good contrast control and maintains printing speed by being able to vary the intensity of the blue or green LEDs independently. By this I don't mean each LED, but each color of LEDs. Think of it as a knob for adjusting the blue, and a knob for adjusting the green. If things are calibrated correctly, you turn both knobs to the max for a print grade of 2. Turn the blue knob down for a lower contrast print, or turn the green knob down for a higher contrast print. If you need a longer exposure time, turn both knobs down.

    Oh - yes the train is a 4-8-8-4, #4023. The photo was taken about 13 years ago in Omaha Nebraska at the park area ran by the Union Pacific Railroad near their offices. The train has since been moved to a city park somewhere in Omaha.
    Those who don't think Photographers have the skills of REAL artists such as painters obviously have not had to spot my prints.

  9. #19

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    I think the idea to use green and blue LEDs is pretty smart. All light is used efficiently so like rexp rightfully states, one can do with much less power. A factor 10 is pretty amazing though. I'm not sure about today's LED prices, but what I do know is that year by year both efficiency (lumen/watt) increases and price ($/watt) decreases in an amazing speed. As a result the overall cost ($/lumen) decreases on average with a factor 2 (TWO) per year. So, even if it is too expensive today, it will be very affordable soon.

  10. #20
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    REXP,

    Clyde Butcher who is known for his 4x6 foot prints and larger can help you on processing. He may even have something on his website about how he processes his prints.

    mike
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

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