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  1. #11
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    It's a very old way of showing prints.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  2. #12
    Tony Egan's Avatar
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    Yes I also believe it goes way back and was/is common with contact prints to tack the dry mounting tissue on the untrimmed print and then trim all the rough black edges and tissue before finally mounting the print to backing board. Also fashionable from time to time is leaving a small black outline around an uncropped enlargement to demonstrate it wasn't cropped - a bit pretentious I think. Does this really make it more "authentic"?

  3. #13

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    Small question on mounting (kinda part of the thread): how does one keep the tissue from showing when doing a floating mount? My tissue seems to be irregularly sized compared to the print, and when I trim before tacking, I can only get rough equvilant sizes. Tacking doesn't seem to give a good edge for further trimming.

    After the print is mounted, and the skirt of the tissue is apparent, it seems a little late.

    And technique for getting accurate floating mounts consistantly?
    A new photo blog of B&W Street photos: GhostManOnFirst.com (2006-02-05)

  4. #14
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jvarsoke
    Small question on mounting (kinda part of the thread): how does one keep the tissue from showing when doing a floating mount? My tissue seems to be irregularly sized compared to the print, and when I trim before tacking, I can only get rough equvilant sizes. Tacking doesn't seem to give a good edge for further trimming.

    After the print is mounted, and the skirt of the tissue is apparent, it seems a little late.

    And technique for getting accurate floating mounts consistantly?
    I spot tack the tissue to the center of thre back of the print and then trim them both together. This ensures that the tissue and print are exactly identical and perfectly aligned.

    I'm not an expert on float matting but I just measure the trimmed print, add the amount of "float" that I want and the cut the mat to that size. I carefully align the mat to the mounted print and then trim and hinge the two boards.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  5. #15
    jovo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jvarsoke
    Tacking doesn't seem to give a good edge for further trimming.
    Are you using a rotary trimmer? Mine holds both print and tissue under a guide bar reasonaby securely. They are both trimmed rather precisely when they've been tacked together as Flotsam describes. The rotary blade doesn't 'pull' on what it's cutting either the way a knife arm sometimes can. Good luck.
    John Voss

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  6. #16
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    jvarsoke -- I tack the tissue over a fairly large area with a clothes iron to one end of the back of the print. When trimming print and tissue, I hold both flat on a guillotine trimmer to keep the print from curling and perhaps not trimming flush with the tissue. If a bit of tissue shows after mounting the print, a razor blade and metal straight edge let one trim it.

  7. #17
    dphphoto's Avatar
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    Dry mounting the print and "floating" the edges of the print within the bevelled mat edges was Ansel Adams's preferred way of displaying prints. I bought some of George Provost's prints a couple of years ago, and he displays his prints this way also, and as I understand it, so do Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee.
    It's hard to do it and get it right. Mostly, you have problems with getting the print trimmed right with the dry mount tissue tacked onto the back of the print. Then, getting the print positioned right in relation to the mat can be difficult, too. I know all this from experience. I did several back when I was first gettng started, over 30 years ago (do I have to admit this?). Since then, I've always overmatted.
    For awhile, I contacted 8X10 onto 11X14, with a mask I cut out of kodalith. Then I'd dry mount the print, and have the mat cut to show the edges of the neg on the paper. That looked kinda cool. I'm thinking of trying that again, but without the dry mounting. Dean
    dphphoto

  8. #18
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Man...am I ever out of the loop way out here at the end of the road...things have changed? To those who don't dry mount - how do you ensure the print is flat...or do you just live with 'the ripples'?

    My way of dry mounting is to first cut the back mat and the over mat with its window. After butting them together along the top edge, with the window mat face down and the back mat face up, temporarily hinge them with a couple small lengths of linen tape. (These will get cut just before the print goes into the drymount press, so I put a couple pencil marks across where the two mats join so I can line them up accurately later).

    Then I cut a slightly too big piece of dry mount tissue, lay it on the back of the print, put a small patch of seal release paper in the centre, and then tack it with a tacking iron. Then, from the centre I draw the tacking iron towards all four edges (but not the corners) of the print without going to the edge. Now it's ready to be flipped over and trimmed to final size and the tissue won't 'creep'.

    After it's trimmed I lay the print face up within the window of the temporarily taped together mats and position it carefully. (To keep the print from sliding around put a piece of soft cloth under something small and heavy and put that in the centre of the print). Once you find its sweet spot, tack a corner of the tissue to the backing mat.

    It's now ready to be put in the drymount press, so cut the temporary hinges and carefully place the print and back mat in the press. After pressing, place a clean mat and a big book over the print and leave it for a few minutes.

    After it's cooled, lay the mounted print and the over mat on a flat surface, line up the pencil marks you made earlier, and tape together with a couple small pieces of linen tape. Flip the overmat over to ensure the print is where it should be within the window, flip back, then apply tape along the whole length of where the mats meet , and then 'burnish' the tape with your thumb nail. I use 1 1/4" Lineco Self-Adhesive Linen Hinging Tape (item #L533-1055).

    That should hold the whole show together for a very long time.

    BITS OF DUST & CRAP WILL DENT & RUIN THE PRINT!

    Murray
    Last edited by MurrayMinchin; 06-07-2006 at 01:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  9. #19
    Curt's Avatar
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    Very common and very practical, you sign the print on the board that the print is mounted on not the matt. If the matt should become edge worn or damaged it can be replaced. The entire print is visible so there is an "honesty" of inclusion. There will not be an edge line from the matt overlapping on the print after years of display or storage. The entire print ages in the same way, no defining lines to later cover up. I could go on buts that's enough. Did you ask the curator of the show? They should know or they should go.

    Regards,

    Curt

  10. #20

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    I use the procedure for dry-mounting outlined in the Seal manual. Pre dry matboards and prints. Tack drymount tissue to print. Put print (with tissue) in press between two sheets of silicone release paper. Press for a little while. Take print out. Use a Rotatrim to cut print (and bonded tissue) to exact size. Postion print on mat board. Tack, press, and cool under a weight. The artwork becomes not just the print but the print plus the backing board. That way the print stays flat, and the title and signiture are clearly visible on the work of art itself, as opposed to on a removable mat.

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