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  1. #11

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    Drugstore prints from the 30's and 40's were usually printed on papers which had a cold black tone such as Azo or Velox. Sepia toning was something that was usually done to portrait prints and not the smaller drugstore ones. Use a cold or neutral tone paper and try adding some benzotriazole to your print developer to further cool the tone to simulate these papers.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    In addition to the films Roger Hicks mentions, Efke's emulsions have reportedly gone more-or-less unchanged since the 1940s or earlier.
    Neat trick, since they weren't introduced until 1952. But maybe 'orthopanchromatic' is a misprint and what they really meant to say is 'orthopanchronologic', to describe an emulsion that can travel back through time.

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    Does anybody but me recall old photos that were debossed in the image area? I seem to recall some old photos where there was an embossed (raised) edge along the border. They must have used some type of press, perhaps a heated one that debossed the image, enhanced the gloss and sped up the drying of the FB paper...

  4. #14
    DBP
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    The drugstore prints I have seen from that time are mostly 6x9 contact prints, but I have seen some 127, and even some 828 (Bantam) format, which are really tiny. 35mm film started into wider use, at least in the US, with the introduction of the Argus A in 1936. By the early 40s it was widespread enough to be commonly covered in photography magazines, and I think between Argus, Kodak and their competitors there were a fair number of miniature format (including Bantam and strange Universal sizes) cameras around. The lenses on most consumer grade cameras of the period ranged from mediocre down, so you really need a lower quality lens to get the same look. Either a box camera or a low end folder will get you there at little expense. Many have simple behind the shutter meniscus lenses.

  5. #15

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    A Rollei deckel-edge trimmer has shown up on eBay several times over the past few years. I'm pretty sure it's the same one each time as it has initials electric-penciled on to the bottom.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    Neat trick, since they weren't introduced until 1952. But maybe 'orthopanchromatic' is a misprint and what they really meant to say is 'orthopanchronologic', to describe an emulsion that can travel back through time.
    OK, so I was off by a decade. No need to get obnoxious about it. They'd still be far closer to the technology and look of the 1930s than most films available today.

  7. #17
    edz
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    OK, so I was off by a decade. No need to get obnoxious about it. They'd still be far closer to the technology and look of the 1930s than most films available today.
    No. Just perhaps to their lower quality standards. Many of the materials that went into older papers (translation: metals such as cadmium) are no longer allowed by European law. You may pretend that the papers are "1940s" or whatever but they are not.. the emulsions are quite different.. and the paper bases too.
    Many of the old photographs were, btw., done in "fast" studios.. the historical equivalent of the photo booth.. and to paper negatives(!) which then got contact printed.
    Amateur drugstore prints were different and 9x13cm into the 1950s were not even the small ones for 35mm film... how about 5x7cm(!). Prints were small since in the price caculation mix the labour was the small and materials the determining factors--- not much different from todays mega-labs that serve the drugstores but to significantly higher price levels. In Germany, for instance, a 100 small prints could amount to a week's wages.. today those 100 prints from a drugstore chain cost less than two pints of beer at the pub.. or a fast food meal..
    I've found to get an old look.. print small, soft focus, white borders with a ragged cut (there cutters are still being made), lower contrast, cold blacks and warm base..
    Edward C. Zimmermann
    BSn R&D // http://www.nonmonotonic.net

  8. #18
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    Another thing often found on old prints is a decorative border printed onto the paper like this.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lewis-Ethel-and-Reba.jpg  
    Gary Beasley

  9. #19

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    If I were going to print on current materials, I would opt for Adox graded paper developed in Amidol for a neutral tone. For warm tone, I would opt for Forte Polywarmtone developed in Amidol and toned in sepia. Both are capable of providing good results.

    The old prints that I have seen are typically limited in local contrast separation while holding overall contrast. That would seem to indicate a film that has a fairly steep gradient. Efke and Tmax films are both capable of getting pretty close depending on the developer that is used.

    I agree that the small prints are really intimate.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  10. #20
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    OK, so I was off by a decade. No need to get obnoxious about it. They'd still be far closer to the technology and look of the 1930s than most films available today.
    Sorry to have appeared obnoxious. Such was not my intent.

    I'm not sure how much the film has to do with the look. I think I come closer to it with TMax and Harvey's developer than I do with Efke.

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