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  1. #21
    PhotoPete's Avatar
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    There is a great treasure trove of American vintage photos over at www.squareamerica.com. Not all will date from the 30's though. I found the site helpful when trying to define what visual elements made vintage photos look vintage.
    Last edited by PhotoPete; 06-20-2006 at 08:04 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: can't spel

  2. #22
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    In the 30's we mostly used orthochromatic film and silver chloride contact printing paper, not POP. POP was primarily used for proofs by portrait studios. if it was not fixed, which was the norm, it would begin to fade within a day or so and the entire image be gone in a few weeks.
    The big difference in the look of the images is the ortho film. Since it is only sensitive to blue light the shadows are more open and reds record as very dark gray or black. I believe the Efke slow films are classed as "Ortho-panchromatic" which is the closest one can get in roll film to the roll film of the 30's.
    Panchromatic film came into more general use with the introduction of Tri-X Pan. They also made Tri-X Ortho for some time after the introduction of the pan film.
    Use of a blue filter on current films will come close to the look of ortho films.

    As for contact paper, the only silver chloride paper available is from Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee. Their web site is www.michaelandpaula.com

    Making contact prints from panchromatic film on enlarging paper containing bromide will not give you the 30's look even with all of the bleaching, insufficient fixing and other manipulations mentioned in this string.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  3. #23

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    In the above reference link you just have to check out In the Booth:

    http://www.squareamerica.com/pb1.htm

  4. #24

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    Ortho film is not only sensitive to blue but the sensitivity extends into the green region of the spectrum.

    Panorthochromatic film does have some red sensitivity but not as much as panchromatic films and the sensitivity does not extend as far into the red region.

    To get the ortho look you need a minus red (cyan) filter not a blue filter since you want some green sensitivity which the blue filter would block..

    Maco makes a true ortho film in 35mm. This is particularly useful for photocopying old faded prints as it restores the contrast and density.

  5. #25
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    Don't forget to bend a corner over and then straight it out. Mount it with the black photo tabs in each corner.

  6. #26
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    I just discovered that Silverprint has deckled-edged scissors (code number 49 325, £4.95) "for that authentic 1930’s look".
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  7. #27

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    Some rotary trimmers include a wheel to do a deckle edge.

  8. #28
    ZorkiKat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel
    In the 30's we mostly used orthochromatic film and silver chloride contact printing paper,...........

    Making contact prints from panchromatic film on enlarging paper containing bromide will not give you the 30's look even with all of the bleaching, insufficient fixing and other manipulations mentioned in this string.
    Curiously, if one flips through the old magazines from the middle 1930s, there would be found a lot of advertisements for panchromatic film. Virtually all of the 35mm film from Dupont, Agfa-Ansco, Gevaert, and Kodak were panchromatic. The word "pan" was also found in the technical information which the published photographs were often found with. There were also a lot of filters mentioned in both the technical credits. Often the filters orange and green, as well as red, were mentioned.

    Ortho film, as Gerald said, is sensitive up the green part of the spectrum. Its effect could be duplicated on pan film by using green, rather than blue filters.
    A strong blue filter will likely mimick the grey rendering of blue-sensitive emulsions which were from an earlier era. DW Griffith, Mack Sennet and Charles Chaplin had their actors made up ghastly white as a necessity, because ruddy complexions would register dark and look unwashed when shot with blue sensitve film.

    I believe it's still the lens/camera combination which counts more in the first step of making "old" pictures. I've loaded Tmax 100 and even TCN in old Ansco Cadet B2 box cameras, Zeiss Ikon folders, and old rangefinders with uncoated Tessar-type lenses and there is always a subtle element of "old" in them, even if the subjects shown are relatively modern.
    FED ZORKI SURVIVAL SITE
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    Zorkikat.Com

    "不管黑猫白猫能抓到老鼠就是好猫。" 邓小平
    It doesn't matter if a cat is black or white, so long as it catches mice.-邓小平

  9. #29
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZorkiKat
    Curiously, if one flips through the old magazines from the middle 1930s, there would be found a lot of advertisements for panchromatic film. ...
    If one filp through a new magazine today, there will be found lots of advertisments for high-end digital cameras. That doesn't necessarily mean that those are used by most photographers.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #30
    Lachlan Young's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    You are not the only person to be fascinated with this look. I love it myself though I often prefer a 5x enlargement off 35mm -- the biggest most people would have gone in the 30s, whole-plate (6.5 x 8.5 inch) paper with a nice big border around the image.

    The best films I have found for a 'generic' 1930s tonality are Forte, preferably overexposed by a stop or so (which also makes for bigger grain and lower sharpness). Fomapan 200 in FX39 comes close to the late 30s/early 40s Kodak tonality. I wouldn't agree with Firecracker because Kodak's films have been updated too often.

    True sulphide toning gives the best browns, NOT thiourea/thiocarbanide. It stinks, but toxicity isn't a significamt issue with even an iota of common sense. Consider how few photographers it killed in the 1930s when it was commonplace.

    Then you need to look for a deckle-edge trimmer to give the raggedy edge on your prints...

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)
    Plus-X exposed in contrasty lighting conditions (ideally using arc or spot lamps) developed in Diafine and printed on ADOX fineprint developed in Eukobrom with a brief selenium tone gives a very nice 'vintage' look to your prints. Like Roger I like 5x enlargements off 35mm film - IMHO a 5x7.5 print on 8x10 paper in an 11x14 mount is near perfect. BTW Fortepan/classicpan 400 seems to have extended red sensitivity which suggests it is optimised for shooting under tungsten hot lamps

    Hope this helps,

    Lachlan

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