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  1. #1
    matti's Avatar
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    Can I go to bed now and wash tomorrow?

    Is there a way to postpone the washing of the prints until the next day? Like now, my kids and wife are asleep. I just had a great printing session, even my mother in law will like one of the prints I made. (As she said earlier today: "It's not that I want to look younger than I am, I just don't want to look older than I feel.")
    Ok, as I don't have running water in the darkroom i put the prints in a bucket until the session is over and I can put them in my newly aquired big archive washer. But now I have to wait for one hour... A nice time to checkout the latest posts at APUG, of course, but I am a bit afraid the running water might wake up the family. So, what would happen if I washed the prints tomorrow instead? Will it destroy the paper?
    I asked here before about washing and got some good advice on trying out alikaline fixers to cut down on washing times. I will do that (if I can find some ingrediences here in Sweden) but it won't really solve this problem completely. And I do really like my Ilford Multigrade FB and don't want to go back to RC...

    /matti

  2. #2
    david b's Avatar
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    Give them a quick rinse, lay them out to dry and then head to bed. Then give them a proper wash tomorrow.

    Sweet dreams.

  3. #3
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Once the residual fixer has dried, it becomes very hard, if not impossible, to remove it.

    You can keep the prints in the water overnight, but if wet for several hours, some of the brighteners will wash out. You may not like the result. Using washing aid for 10 min, a final wash of 30 min should be sufficient. Alternatively, you can also use diffusion washing. It won't be much quicker, but uses less water. For the former method, not much water flow is needed. It shouldn't wake up the family.

    Once washed, you can postpone the toning until the next day, but not the washing itself.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #4
    Petzi's Avatar
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    Yes I agree, washing should be done immediately.
    If you're not taking your camera...there's no reason to travel. --APUG member bgilwee

  5. #5
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Fifty years ago a photographer told me he used to print and develop quantities of school photos in the evening and dump them in a full bathtub. Next day, while he was at his regular job, his wife washed and dried them. It might be good enough for school photos, but I wouldn't recommend it for quality images on modern material. Emulsions can get awfully soft when soaked too long. Also, if a print isn't completely submerged, the demarcation line between wet and dry might become permanently visible.

  6. #6
    david b's Avatar
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    I guess I stand corrected. Thanks for setting me straight.

  7. #7

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    David Vestal discovered that for his purposes an archival wash for him consisted of an overnight soak. This was confirmed by his own tests and a proper lab also.
    Try it do the soak and try the ht2 test for residual hypo.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #8
    matti's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the warnings. It sounds like some papers might work better than others but maybe it's too much of a risk anywy. If I can find a way to drain the archive washer into a well in the floor in the basement it might solve the problem in a better way.

    BTW, they didn't wake up :-) And the pictures came out fine, even though I must say I need to get a little bit more control over dry down darkening.

    /matti

  9. #9
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Matti

    The rule-of-thumb for dry-down is 1/12 stop (5%). Prepare the wet print to your liking and then reduce the exposure by 1/12 stop, When dry, it will match the darker, moist print.
    However, don't confuse dry-down with using the wrong evaluation light in the darkroom. One gremlin is using bright, fluorescent lights in the darkroom to evaluate the wet prints, and then being disappointed when looking at the dry print under 'normal' lighting conditions. I use a 100W bulb at 2m to evaluate the print in the darkroom. If the print looks OK there, it will look fine outside of the darkroom too. Evaluation lighting should equal viewing lights. Having darkroom lights too bright will lead to disappointment later.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #10
    Petzi's Avatar
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    The longer the paper has contact with any chemicals, the deeper they get into the fibre base. And the deeper they get, the longer you have to wash. There used to be an instruction by Ilford on how to wash archival FB prints within a few minutes with a minimal amount of water. It involved a 30 sec fix in a highly active fixer (Hypam 1+4), this had to be timed. Too long and the chemical would get deeper into the paper, too short and the print wouldn't be fixed properly. That's how I understood it at least. The fixer had to be fresh of course.
    If you're not taking your camera...there's no reason to travel. --APUG member bgilwee

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