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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by eric View Post
    To see if your basic, good old metronome is working right, put the weight on 60 beats per minute.
    See if it takes 1 minute to do 60 beats. Umm, pretty simple huh?
    That's the problem. Not complicated enough!

    Cheers,

    R.

  2. #12

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    If you wish to do burning or dodging then a metronone is probably your best bet. Otherwise, a simple one to control the enlarger and settable to a 1/10 of a second is all that is necessary.

  3. #13
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Cheaper than the metronome is a digital wall clock that ticks once a second. The dial is useful in timing print development. Some wind-up clocks also work well, and are louder than digital clocks. Not all of them tick four times a second, though.

  4. #14
    Mark Pope's Avatar
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    The beauty of the RH designs timer is being able to do f stop printing very easily.
    Mark Pope
    Swindon, Wilts
    UK

    http://www.monomagic.co.uk

  5. #15

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    Hi,

    Thanks for all the valuable replies.

    Anyway, I found that a local camera store here has a used ET-500 without a footswitch and the shopkeep agreed to sell it to me at a good low price.

    I'll pick it up one of these days. So now, I'm off to the next item on my list.

    Many thanks again.

    Best Regards,
    annie

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    That's the problem. Not complicated enough!
    That's the ticket. All you'd ever NEED to do is set the metronome one time to 60 BPM and you're done. Why would anyone ever need to adjust it in the dark?

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    That's the ticket. All you'd ever NEED to do is set the metronome one time to 60 BPM and you're done. Why would anyone ever need to adjust it in the dark?

    Well, there might be the Zone System approach, where you need to set it faster or slower when you're developing film for N+ or N-. Trying to re-set it in the dark would be more difficult, and therefore morally superior.

    For some people, remember, the purpose of photography is not to make good pictures; it's to purify the soul through suffering.

    Cheers,

    R

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwmullet View Post
    I agree about a metronome. That's what I use. I'm curious, though, why does a metronome have to be digital to have adjustable beats per minute? I thought all metronome down to the old style wooden ones with the swinging arm and weight were adjustable. If they weren't, they'd be pretty useless, wouldn't they?

    Maybe I misunderstand.

    FWIW, there's an article out at Michaelandpaula.com about the benefits of using a metronome.
    I tried adjusting the regular "analog" metronomes, but I had a hard time lining it up exactly at the BPM I wanted. with a digital you just choose 60 or 61, there is no 60.482381. a regular ol wooden metronome is just fine, but I just bought the digital one because it was the same price, and I'd rather just always adjust it to 65 from 60 for drydown, instead of getting a calculator and adjusting all the times for 60 bpm. whatever works.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    Well, there might be the Zone System approach, where you need to set it faster or slower when you're developing film for N+ or N-. Trying to re-set it in the dark would be more difficult, and therefore morally superior.

    For some people, remember, the purpose of photography is not to make good pictures; it's to purify the soul through suffering.

    Cheers,

    R
    Roger!
    I think the best way is to simply count one one thousand, two two thousand etc...

  10. #20

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    I don't have any personal experience with the StopClock Pro, having an Analyzer Pro instead; that said, the timer was worth the money several times over. The Analyzer Pro has a little sensor that needs to be calibrated for your paper settings, but when you get it done you can get a work print very quickly. The StopClock Pro has an additional exposure channel and a bunch of tricks that are very useful if you primarily do test strip printing; I haven't particulraly missed them when I have the sensor on the AP calibrated, although I have longed for them when I didn't have the AP fully up and running.

    If you get the StopClock Pro and decide you want the sensor later, RHDesigns sells an exposure meter that you can hook into the SCP; you don't have to rebuy the timer.

    I occasionally have to use normal timers, and it's amazing how irritating it is after using the RHDesigns stuff.

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