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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    923
    I'm 63. My prints 40 years ago were high contrast and meaningless.

    Today my prints exhibit more sublety than ever, partly due to better film processing. I suspect some people are influenced by the garish prints you see in exhibitions these days, tonality seems to be out of fashion.

    On the other hand there are more lith prints with tonality being made than ever. What goes around comes around.
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  2. #32
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
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    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,799
    Perhaps the available materials have affected taste in contrast. Negatives from even before my time are usually contrasty. This may partly have been because they were often contact printed. It may have been an attempt to record mid-range tonality better with those films. Some alternative printing required contrasty negatives. Short toe negatives and multi-coated lenses have changed the way we photograph and print. Mass production B&W printers could make flat prints easier than full range prints. Personal preferences of master printers may change our standards. Cole Weston prints from his father's negatives seem contrastier than Edward's prints. Brett Weston's prints from his own negatives seem contrastier yet. We often have better lighting under which to view prints. There are a mind-boggling range of factors affecting how we see photographs, let alone print them. More important than all of this is for us to print the way that feels best to us today.

  3. #33
    Pragmatist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bath, NY
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    Medium Format
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    598
    Back when I started with film in the early 70s, I used Pan-X and almost exclusively grade 3 (or 4) papers. Yes, quite a bit of contrast pop, and this is what formed the scenes that I visualized in the first order.

    Now I find that I am stepping backward; seeking greater local contrast in detail, fine graduation and a long curve between dMin and dMax. Some shots demand a hard 3 in Ansco 130. Others are a fine division between Dektol and Selectol... But, the final result must not need to be viewed in bright light to avoid the "mushy" greys. This is one of the reasons that I am taking up 8x10 and setting up contact print on AZO (yes, I have hoarded a boatload in the recent past).

    In other things, I find as I get older things appear much more black and white than they used too...
    Patrick

    something witty and profound needs to be inserted here...

  4. #34
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
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    I started with B&W years ago (30+), but have almost totally migrated to color. Where does that put me?
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

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