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  1. #11
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    An advert I saw for Superfix says "same dilution as for Hypam", so 1+9 for paper will be fine. Using fixer at 1+4 allows for quicker fixing with fibre paper so it does not absorb so much of the fixer, allowing shorter wash times. With RC paper, the fixer is not absorbed at all (except a little at the edge of the paper) because of the plastic coating so it does not really matter which you use - just allow twice the fixing time for 1+9 over 1+4. 4 square metres = 80 8x10s

    I always let RC prints drain for 15 seconds before putting in the next bath (fibre: 30 secs) to keep contamination to a minimum. Good choice of citric acid stop bath - no smell . If it has an indicator added, keep an eye on it and dump it as soon as it starts to lose its yellow colour. Tetenal also do a low-odour version of Superfix if that was not the version you bought. I use the Fotospeed equivalents - the low odour stuff really helps in the darkroom!

    Cheers, Bob.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F. View Post
    Most rapid fixer instructions seem to say dilute
    1+9 for paper anyway (though I follow Ilford's
    sequence and mix it at film strength). Bob.
    Ilford no longer supports the "sequence" you have in
    mind. You are refering to the no longer mentioned
    "Archival Processing Sequence"

    Emphasis has shifted to silver levels in the fixer
    and "optimal" is now the word. Review Ilford's
    recent fixer PDFs.

    They do strongly suggest the two bath fix. Dan

  3. #13
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Whch doc? I can not find a fixer doc on the Ilford site that does not detail the sequence. The most recent fixer docs on the Ilford site are dated 2002 (Hypam and Rapid Fixer docs). Both contain the following:

    Wash the prints
    for 5 minutes in running water above 5ºC (41ºF),
    drain off the excess water and immerse the prints
    for 10 minutes in a dish/tray of 1 + 4 WASHAID
    at 18–24ºC (64–75ºF). Finally, wash the prints for
    5 minutes in running water above 5ºC (41ºF).
    They also still recommend 1 minute in 1+4 strength fixer (2 mins for 1+9). This constitutes the "Optimum permanence sequence" that is also detailed in all the current FB paper docs too.

    Silver content in the fixer is of course always paramount to any method, which is why I use the Tetenal test strips.

    Cheers, Bob.

  4. #14
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F. View Post
    Whch doc? I can not find a fixer doc on the Ilford site that does not detail the sequence. The most recent fixer docs on the Ilford site are dated 2002 (Hypam and Rapid Fixer docs). Both contain the following:

    They also still recommend 1 minute in 1+4 strength fixer (2 mins for 1+9). This constitutes the "Optimum permanence sequence" that is also detailed in all the current FB paper docs too.

    Silver content in the fixer is of course always paramount to any method, which is why I use the Tetenal test strips.

    Cheers, Bob.
    How about a two-bath fix in film-strength fixer, 1 minute each? Washing tests show that fixing in film-strength fixer up to 2 minutes still makes for a clean wash within 30 minutes if wash aid is used. This sequence leaves no non-image silver and only traces of hypo. It is my preferred choice.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #15
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    How about a two-bath fix in film-strength fixer, 1 minute each? Washing tests show that fixing in film-strength fixer up to 2 minutes still makes for a clean wash within 30 minutes if wash aid is used. This sequence leaves no non-image silver and only traces of hypo. It is my preferred choice.
    Why not? It's a tried and tested method. The Ilford fixer docs do not specify a fixing method to go with the wash sequence: only that 1+4 for 1 minute is one of the options listed earlier in the doc, as is 1+9 for 2 mins and the two bath method.

    Cheers, Bob.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F. View Post
    The Ilford fixer docs do not specify a fixing method to go
    with the wash sequence: only that 1+4 for 1 minute is one
    of the options listed earlier in the doc, as is 1+9 for 2 mins
    and the two bath method. Cheers, Bob.
    You did catch that. At one time Ilford had an Archival
    Processing Sequence. The 5-10-5 wash sequence was
    specific to the initial 30 second then later changed to
    the 60 second fix in their film strength fixer. They
    specified their HCA. They claimed a 40 8x10
    capacity per liter working strength.

    The MGIV, 12/01, and the Gallerie, 3/02, PDFs still
    specify the 60 second fix in conjunction with the 5-10-5
    wash. As you've stated the 5-10-5 wash sequence is no
    longer specific to any one method of fixing.

    In order to meet their 0.5 gram per liter standard only
    10 8x10 prints per liter working strength can be
    processed. And, they do average prints for
    silver content. Dan
    .

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