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Thread: Agfa Portriga

  1. #11
    Steve Sherman's Avatar
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    The last of the good Portriga was manufactured in the late 80's. The emulsion was changed by removing the Cadmium so as to be more environmentally friendly. This effectively destroyed the best properties of Portriga Rapid.

    Because it is a Chloro-Bromide emulsion it does keep somewhat better than pure Bromide emulsions.

    It really depends on the packaging, I have a nice supply of early 80’s Portriga which I have kept refrigerated without any ill effects.

    If the Grade label is dark blue, or even light blue with no red markings in the label and it is not fogged it is worth its weight in gold.
    Real Photographs are Born Wet !
    http://www.steve-sherman.com

  2. #12
    climbabout's Avatar
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    portriga

    I second Steve's comments - I have a supply of the old portriga from the same batch Steve speaks of - I've kept it frozen - leaving 1 package in the darkroom from which I currently work from - it's a wonderful paper, unequalled in my opinion, by anything manufactured today - assuming you like the warm tones that it's known for.
    Tim Jones

  3. #13

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    The only paper I have here which is fogged is some Polyfiber. Also a box of Insignia(Record Rapid) which makes great pseudo-platinum prints.
    I have Elite, Galerie. Portriga and Varilour which are just fine, and some G4 Brovira which came up in the hold of a ship in 1975, it is still G4 and clean.

    Oh yes the famous Pal Print and Pal Brom. The Print is fogged the Bromide fine.

    If you dabble in development, CuSO4 bleach and redevelopment as per Tim Rudman's books, fogged papers can be an asset. Sometimes the fog will not appear in lith developer
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  4. #14
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Steve;

    The formulas I have are converted chloro-bromo-iodide emulisions in which only the higher contrast grades contained Cadmium. I think that they could have made the higher grades without cadmium if they could make the lower grades that way. Too bad they didn't.

    PE

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    wilsonneal's Avatar
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    Gosh I loved Portriga in the early 80's. When I was a photo student it was all we used.

    I was in the darkroom last night making mostly Palladium (with a tiny bit of Pt) prints on this new Weston Diploma paper that they're talking about in the Alt group, and it strongly reminded me of Portriga from back in the day.

    Neal

  6. #16
    Will S's Avatar
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    So should I try it in a warm tone developer (Ilford Warmtone) or Amidol? Ansco 130? I'll try the lith developer if it is fogged.

    Thanks all,

    Will
    "I am an anarchist." - HCB
    "I wanna be anarchist." - JR

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    In the U.K there is a law of the buyer having the right to expect goods of merchandiseable quality i.e. it does what it is supposed to do. I'd be surprised if there isn't such a law in the U.S. Worth asking the question before buying. That way you know if you have a fight on your hands even if you have the law on your side, if it is useless.

    pentaxuser

  8. #18
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    Forte Polywarmtone is probably the closest equivalent today, though I have yet to try Fomatone MG or ADOX Fineprint.
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  9. #19
    climbabout's Avatar
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    agfa portriga developer

    Quote Originally Posted by Will S View Post
    So should I try it in a warm tone developer (Ilford Warmtone) or Amidol? Ansco 130? I'll try the lith developer if it is fogged.

    Thanks all,

    Will
    Will - I prefer dr. beers - because of it's ability to control contrast - you can go approximately 3/4 grade in each direction with different dilutions. I've also used amidol on occasion with pleasing results. I know Steve Sherma uses gaf135 with beautiful results as well. A little selenium toner to get rid of the olive cast and you get a beautiful warm tone.
    Tim Jones

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