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  1. #11
    reellis67's Avatar
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    Alan,

    I'd love to see the results. Do you have them on the Internet anywhere?

    Aslo, I've just found an interesting book that goes into great detail on the materials used for various painting media, with special focus on oils, that looks like a valuable resource. It's titled "The Artist's Handbook of Materials and Techniques" (ISBN: 0670136662) and it covers, in great detail, the history and use of many of the materials discussed in this thread. It's a tome and a half, so I've only gotten through the beginning, but it looks like a great resource for this type of work.

    - Randy

  2. #12

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    Randy,
    Not yet! I am still experimenting. I've only just started doing this.
    Your book sounds very useful, but if you want to make a start you only need a bottle of Liquin some turpentine and a tube of oil colour.
    You showed a link to some acrylic products. Because these are water based they may cockle the print. I would think oil glazes like Liquin are much more user friendly;and they keep the print flat, and are very workable because they don't dry quickly.

    Alan Clark

  3. #13
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    In the 1940's I learned to wax prints which hid some retouching as well as impartng a nice sheen to the print. Waxing is of some help in separating close tones and really is quite nice to look at.

    I still have one last stick of Dorland's Print Wax. I believe it basically is carnauba wax in a small amont of parafin to make it easier to form into a stick.

    I have on occasion used carnauba wax from an auto supplier, but it is getting more difficult to find one without additives.

    Some of the clear glazes mentioned above should work very well is thinned appropriately.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #14
    reellis67's Avatar
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    According to the book I'm reading, which references oil painting using these materials, carnuba is very hard, but that also makes it difficult to remove. I'm not sure if you would want to remove it from a print, so it might be a good choice. I've not yet gotten to the point where waxes are discussed in detail, but there are other choices out there. Someone recently mentioned to me that microcrystaline wax is good for photographic prints, but I've not had the time to properly research that so I wouldn't try it on anything important just yet.

    Jim,

    I'd be interested in hearing if you ever find out what the composition of the Dorland's product is.

    - Randy

  5. #15

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    Carnuba wax is used by woodturners. I have a stick and it is very hard indeed. I know that some woodturners mix it 50-50 with beeswax which is soft, to get something that is in between.
    Not sure how I would apply my stick of wax to a photograph.
    When you did it Jim did you melt the wax first, or perhaps soften it in turpentine?

    Alan Clark

  6. #16
    Gim
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    You might want to take a look at Renaissance Wax. I used to have some info on it but that is gone now. On the can it says "Refined waxes blended to a formula used by the British Museum and restoration specialist internationally to revive and protect valuable furniture, leather, paintings, metals, marble, ivory etc. Freshens colours, imparts soft sheen."

    I believe I have read that it can be used on papers...and I think it can be used on anything.
    Jim

  7. #17
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    Renaissance wax is microcrystaline wax- very hard (no fingerprints), very white (as in "not yellow" -clear when applied thinly and polished) and supposedly very kind to antique and delicate surfaces. I have used it on fiber prints over glazes that had dried completely to even out the surface sheen. I have also used it on oil paintings. It is removeable with mild thinner and pretty goof-proof.

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