Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,555   Posts: 1,545,020   Online: 815
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    Now I hang them from clotheslines and flatten them in a dry mounting press after they are completely dry.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #12
    DrPablo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    796
    Images
    63
    Adorama and B+H have various print dryers that take up to 16x20, and they go for ~ $200 to $250. Are they worth it?

    I tried the ironing trick today, but it didn't work. The prints might have already dried too much by the time I tried. I'm done trying the blotter book with the print facing the thin paper -- it dried with all kinds of horrible artifacts. Even if the print is largely dry, facing the blotter I get lint stuck all over it. I got a print framed today, and the framers are dry-mounting it, so that will take care of the wrinkles, but I'm not going to do that with every print.
    Paul

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    For fibre prints I have always dried in a forced hot-air dryer on nylon screens, then flattened them in a dry mounting press. Works great.

  4. #14
    percepts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sceptred Isle
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    263
    use drying screens and dry face down slowly.

    The gelatin always dries faster than the paper which isn't surprising since the paper is much thicker and holds a lot more water. The Gelatin also contracts more than the paper when drying. If you allow to dry too fast, then gelatin will dry and produce more curl. Drying face down on screens restricts airflow over gelatin side and so water from the paper evaporates off at a greater relative rate to the gelatin. If dried slowly enough like this, you will have no significant curl and very importantly, you will have no tension in the gelatin or paper caused by drying. If you dry rapidly you will get that tension build up in the paper fibres and gelatin and the print will curl at a later date, from take up of moisture in the air.

    i.e. patience is the name of the game otherwise you are asking for trouble which is what you seem to have. Dry face down in a cool place for at least 24 hours.

    Trying to flatten after drying will leave the tension in the paper fibres unless you re-wet the paper.
    Percepts,
    An old dog learning new tricks...

    Black and White Landscape Prints

  5. #15
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,780
    Dry'em between screens. Press in drymount press. Let cool in press. Viola. FAF.

  6. #16
    jeroldharter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,958
    Images
    1
    I used to use drying screens but they also attract dust, take up alot of floor space, need to be cleaned, etc. Nevertheless, I was happy with them until I started to get occasional embossing of the screen image on the emulsion after the prints dried. Not very happy about that. Then I tried drying them face up but I would get some water marks where the water would pool. I don't like the idea of using a squeegee on a wet print emulsion either.

    In the end, I installed some vinyl clothes lines and use Clipex clips to hang the prints vertically. If I have alot of prints, I hang them up back to back. My darkroom is fairly dust free and I have had no problems. I flatten the prints in a dry mount press with release paper on top of the print that is sandwiched in mat board. The clips do leave a small mark on the white border of the print but that gets trimmed off in the end.
    Jerold Harter MD

  7. #17
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    I tried the ironing trick today, but it didn't work. The prints might have already dried too much by the time I tried.
    When you iron the prints, the emulsion side should be smooth, so that it does not stick to a dry finger, but the base should retain some humidity. Partially humid FB paper bends very easily and stays put. You need to dry the prints only up to the point at which the emulsion side is dry because you do not want them to adhere to the watercolor paper, but not more than that is needed. I gotta say that it's easier to dry 8x10 this way than 11x14 and above.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  8. #18
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Dry'em between screens. Press in drymount press. Let cool in press. Viola. FAF.
    Excuse my French, as they say, but it's "voilà"
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  9. #19
    tbm
    tbm is offline
    tbm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    365
    I use Ilford's fiber paper and hang my prints on a line via plastic clothspins overnight. The next morning, I place each print in a book and pile multiple books on top of that book. They then become wonderfully flat!

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    Lots of techniques listed here, I'll throw mine in.
    I hang them back to back from a line, with clips also at the bottom corners, back to back (yes, they leave marks, but I leave enough border that they are covered by the matte). I use plastic clothespins, easier to keep clean than wood. As pointed out, the slower the better. Sometimes in winter, I leave trays of water underneath to encourage humidity in the room. (The drying lines are over the sink.) There are three lines about a foot apart, loaded from the back to the front. I can fill a 16x20 Gravity Works washer with 12 prints and dry them all.
    After drying, I sandwich each print in a glassine "folder" (cut up from a roll purchased at an art supply store), then put into the dry mount press, at very low temp, just enough to feel warm, then I turn it off. Take them out the next day. I'm told by framers that you don't even need the heat. If you don't have a press, a single sheet of flat aluminum or some material (or even thick plexiglass would probably work) with the prints under and weight on top.
    If you take the prints out and leave them out, they will recurl to some degree, fiber memory, I think someone said. But if you store them, back to back again in a tight container (like a paper pack or box) they should stay flat.
    No matter what I do, though, when I go to frame a print, by the time I measure it, cut the matte, and assemble the frame, it has recurled to some extent at the edges. (I don't drymount them - another discussion).

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin