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  1. #1
    DrPablo's Avatar
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    Dry-ving me nuts

    I'm having the worst time trying to dry fiber prints (8x10 and 11x14). I have bought two different print blotters, both described as 'lint free'. Both coat my prints in lint if they're facing the blotter side, and both cause a weird shrivelled wax-paper patern if the back is on the blotter side. When I've hung the prints up I get indentations from the print/film clips in the face of the print. If I lie it flat it curls up and I have to spend 2 weeks waiting for it to flatten.
    Paul

  2. #2
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    There's been much discussion about this. Try a "search this forum" search in the applicable forums, or "flat" in the Advanced Forum Search (titles only). That should give you a couple hours of reading

    Then again, if you can wait a little while;

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/32949-entirely-flat-fibre-base-ilford-photo.html

    Murray

    P.S. Drying fb VC paper face up on screens, heating them in a drymount press, then cooling them between heavy books (in a matt board 'envelope') does a pretty good-ish job.
    Last edited by MurrayMinchin; 12-26-2006 at 11:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  3. #3
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I found that when I used blotters and didn't change the blotters at least once during the drying process while the prints were still damp, I had a blotter lint nightmare that required re-wetting the prints and wiping the lint off and redrying.
    Needless to say, I gave up on blotters real quick.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  4. #4
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Let the prints air dry for a while face up (let's say overnight) then iron them when sandwiched between two pieces of watercolor paper with a clothes iron on "cotton" (low) setting. Works wonders.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  5. #5
    DrPablo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    Let the prints air dry for a while face up (let's say overnight) then iron them when sandwiched between two pieces of watercolor paper with a clothes iron on "cotton" (low) setting. Works wonders.
    I've thought about doing that, that may be my alternative to getting a dryer for now.
    Paul

  6. #6
    lee
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    I have been using drying screens for nearly 40 years.

    lee\c

  7. #7
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    When overseas in the Navy I used to dry FB prints between the sheets of my bunk. A blanket held them fairly flat. Then they were stored, alternately face up and face down, in a tightly packed box. This kept them flat.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam View Post
    I found that when I used blotters and didn't change the blotters at least once during the drying process while the prints were still damp, I had a blotter lint nightmare that required re-wetting the prints and wiping the lint off and redrying.
    Needless to say, I gave up on blotters real quick.
    i still use the blotters and they work fine. you only get the blotter lint on the paper when the paper's still wet when you put it under the blotters.
    let it dry for a few hours or use a blow-dryer until the gelatine is dry, the backside can still be wet.

  9. #9

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    I use blotters and never had a problem. The way I get nice flat prints is this: I squeegee all the water off both sides and wipe the back well with a clean paper towel. Then, I hang the print by a corner, using a plastic clothespin. I keep the clothes pin in the corner margin as much as possible. Things dry fast here, so, I alternate corners every 15 minutes or so, until the print just feels dry to the touch. At that point the print should be fairly flat, not curled up like a tater chip. That's when I stack them between blotter sheets under weight. I leave them overnight. They come out very nice and never any lint.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrPablo View Post
    I'm having the worst time trying to dry fiber prints ...
    Check out this site for sheet drying gear:
    From Google enter, plant flower and leaf presses .

    I use the Ventilation A flute corrugated board but do
    not use blotters. Instead I use a non-woven hydrophobic
    liner material which does not blot. Check your local fabric
    supply for Pellon or similar.

    Prints are sponge then screen dried until a hint of
    warpage appears. At that time they are placed in the
    dryer stack. I weight my stack but you may wish one
    of the strap down units. Acorn Naturalists offer three
    or four models. Also they have all the parts needed
    to tailor your own dryer stack. For that water
    proof material shop local. Conservators do
    have it though. Dan

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