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  1. #31
    juan's Avatar
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    Yes, that's what I'm doing in Ansco 130 in a regular tray- agitating the negative for a period of time, then allowing it to sit still for a period of time. I get results that are similar to water bath - for the same reasons, to allow the highlights to develop just a little more.
    juan

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Sherman View Post
    Now that you mention it, stand development with paper likely would yield reduced paper contrast. So many times I find little techniques have the exact opposite effect from negative to positive.
    Yeah, you're probably right Steve. Thanks for the thought anyway.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  3. #33

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    Just been through exactly the same angst as you Phototone - I've just returned to the darkroom after 25 years and was dreading the thought of using VC paper - after all, nothing could replace the old Galerie grade 3 could it? Well, I've just produced the best quality print of my life using Ilford Multigrade FB1V - I even tried printing the same neg on some graded Kentmere and Oriental for comparison but they just didn't have the depth and range of tones that the Multigrade produced - can't believe I'm saying this! And the best thing of all is that I'll be able to buy this paper for at least the next 10 years.....won't I......?? Try printing the best neg you have on both types for comparison, that will answer all your questions.
    Patricia

  4. #34

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    "Stand Development" of paper is a technique I often use. My normal development is rarely below 3 mins. Stand Development (sometimes known as Draging) will lower the contrast of the print but also (in most cases) produce a cooler tone. I will usually use a normal agitation for the first min or so and then sink the print to the bottom of the tray for the remaining 2, 3 or 4, etc. mins with no agitation.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by patricia de roeck View Post
    Just been through exactly the same angst as you Phototone - I've just returned to the darkroom after 25 years and was dreading the thought of using VC paper - after all, nothing could replace the old Galerie grade 3 could it? Well, I've just produced the best quality print of my life using Ilford Multigrade FB1V - I even tried printing the same neg on some graded Kentmere and Oriental for comparison but they just didn't have the depth and range of tones that the Multigrade produced - can't believe I'm saying this! And the best thing of all is that I'll be able to buy this paper for at least the next 10 years.....won't I......?? Try printing the best neg you have on both types for comparison, that will answer all your questions.
    Patricia
    Patricia, I think that about sums it up. Obviously, at least to your eye and to mine as well, the quality of variable contrast papers has improved tremendously over the years. Many years ago, my main paper was grade 2 Kodabromide, flirting occassionally with Agfa Brovira. Looking back on some of those prints and comparing them with prints made from the same negatives with modern variable contrast papers, I can honestly say that the newer prints look far better. My technique has improved over the years, but that is only part of the story. The ability to control contrast with a color head, in addition to burning and dodging with different contrast filters, has made a lot of things possible that could not be done as easily and controllably, or even at all, with graded papers.

  6. #36

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    I recently tried a package of #3 Galerie. It was great for the negatives that fit its contrast range but they are too few for me to switch and VC Ilford and Oriental WT fiber look similar in quality; just a different curve.
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 09-04-2007 at 10:59 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by patricia de roeck View Post
    Try printing the best neg you have on both types for comparison, that will answer all your questions.
    That's a good point, because if you don't try it for yourself, how will you ever know?

    I had always used the original Zone VI Brilliant then changed to Ilford Galerie when Brilliant II came out, because Brilliant II's grade 1 moved to almost where the original Brilliant's grade 2 used to be. This frustrated me because I had won a hard fought battle with the zone system and the new Brilliant gave me hardly any wiggle room at the soft end of things. Switching to Galerie allowed me to keep my negative developing times the same.

    About six years ago I was in Calgary and saw some photographs of the Rockies on greeting cards by Craig Richards. The photographs and the quality of the reproductions were so good, I just had to search him out in Banff on our way home. When I found out he was using VC paper I just couldn't believe it! My experience with the stuff was from working with RC paper in the darkroom of our local small newspaper in the early 80's and there was NO WAY that stuff could even come close to Brilliant or Galerie!!

    Today I use selenium toned Multigrade IVFB (in an Ansco 120-ish Glycin developer) and I think it stands shoulder to shoulder with both the original Brilliant and Galerie.

    Another thing I like about my new paper is that I can order one 50 sheet box of 16x20, then use it for all my printing...from 5x7 prints all the way up to 16x20 prints, so all my printing is done on the same emulsion batch and I don't have to buy a box for every size or grade anymore. (I have to mail order all my supplies, and doing this keeps money in my pocket...although that's way down on my list of priorities when it comes to print quality!)

    I did what Patricia suggests and was more than pleased with the results, and I can now dodge and burn at different contrast grades giving me even more control than I used to have

    Murray
    Last edited by MurrayMinchin; 09-05-2007 at 09:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

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