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  1. #41
    Antje's Avatar
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    Folks, we don't have a single filament bulb in our house and lead a happy life. We had a few problems with cheap fluorescent lights at the beginning, they failed pretty quickly. But since we switched to a major manufacturer, they last forever. I couldn't even say where we keep the replacement bulbs. Also, the warm-up time only means that they reach the highest light output after five minutes. They are bright from the start.
    A major concern was the colour temperature, but the manufactures started to produce lamps with a pleasing colour temp years ago. And a really nice thing for me, the macro shooter with an insect fixation, is that insects no longer are grilled in our torchiere.

    Give it a chance. You might like it.

    Antje

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto View Post
    Georges:

    One of the (few) things that I remember from engineering school was the quotation by Lord Kelvin -

    "I often say that when you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it: but when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meager and unsatisfactory kind; it may be the beginning of knowledge, but you have scarcely, in your thoughts, advanced to the stage of a science, whatever the matter may be."

    Your observation is very correct - many of the things that environmentalists (or representatives from any other special interest group) advocate fail to make any sense at all when you take the time to examine them in careful detail. They are intended to appeal to the emotions rather than to logic.

    One example. We are told to replace incandescent lamps with CFLs, and to unplug our cell phone chargers when they are not actually being used to charge the phone. I'm an engineer, and I put number on things. And when I put numbers on the first of those recommendations, I fine that the higher economy of a 27w. CFL offsets its cost premium over a 100w incandescent lamp (both producing about 1500 lumens of light) at the prevailing cost of electricity in our area after 300 hours of operation. And based on that analysis, all of the lamps in our home that operate more than 300 hours per year are now CFL.

    But the transformer that charges my cell phone is rated 6 watts. And assuming that it is a fairly inefficient design, the no load losses should be about 1%. At the same energy cost rate used in the CFL analysis, that cell phone charger is consuming about US$0.08 of electricity per year.

    So I can accept the CFL argument because the numbers make sense. But that amount of energy wasted because my cell phone charger remains plugged in continuously is microscopic by comparison.

    The point - let's deal with facts and not emotional exaggeration.
    But it is the cumulative effect of those microscopic wastages (i.e. phantom loads) that, when aggregated across all users, begins to become of concern.

    I am essentially in the same position as you are in that I have m/l replaced all incandescents (at least as they burn out) with CFLs because there is a very significant reduction in electric consumption. And I similarly always leave the cell phone charger plugged in. But if the charger or its power cord had a convenient to use on/off switch I'd probably turn it off when not in use.

    It does seem that provision of simply on/off switches on many devices would not be difficult or expensive to provide and would then at least give the consumer the choice (other than unplugging the TV from the wall etc.) of elimintating a phantom load should she/he want to do so.

  3. #43
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    It does seem that provision of simply on/off switches on many devices would not be difficult or expensive to provide and would then at least give the consumer the choice (other than unplugging the TV from the wall etc.) of elimintating a phantom load should she/he want to do so.
    Which is exactly what most equipment was fitted with before remote control took over.

    I think it would be good to have this fitted again.

    In the UK, most of our mains sockets are fitted with switches. Am I correct in thinking that the US socket is not switched?

    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #44

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    I belive in Europe too only UK have mains socket with swiches...

    Well, if you want switches for yours gadgets, and you dont know to install swich on power cord of your gadget, use extension cord with preinstalled swich. For 1 or 2 EUROS it is not expancive. I do that

    I do that with my computer too. And I think power unit of computer don't like that, I had to but new one after 6 months...
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
    No things in life should be left unfinis

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Which is exactly what most equipment was fitted with before remote control took over.

    I think it would be good to have this fitted again.

    In the UK, most of our mains sockets are fitted with switches. Am I correct in thinking that the US socket is not switched?

    Steve.
    Steve,

    You are partially correct. Most outlets in the US are not switched. Some are, usually in living rooms and bedrooms, so that a floor lamp (for example) can be turned on and off from a wall switch.

    Quote Originally Posted by haris View Post
    I belive in Europe too only UK have mains socket with swiches...

    Well, if you want switches for yours gadgets, and you dont know to install swich on power cord of your gadget, use extension cord with preinstalled swich. For 1 or 2 EUROS it is not expancive. I do that

    I do that with my computer too. And I think power unit of computer don't like that, I had to but new one after 6 months...
    haris,

    To encourage conservation you need to make it easy for the consumer to do so. While either of your solutions "work", they put obstacles (albeit, small ones) in the path to ease of conservation and thus lessen the likliehood many people will bother.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    In the UK, most of our mains sockets are fitted with switches. Am I correct in thinking that the US socket is not switched?

    Steve.
    Correct. Virtually all mains sockets are not switched.

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