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  1. #11

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (bmacphoto.com @ Oct 16 2002, 10:16 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>"Should I go with a digital..."</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    Go digital; easier to use and more versatile. I can recommend the Saunders
    ET 500. It includes enlarger and safelight outlets and foot switch inlet. Low
    range is from 0.1 to 99.9 seconds and hi range is from 1 to 999 seconds.

    Hi, low, and off light levels and tone at end or count, are usefull. Nice size
    LEDs and start/reset button make for easy use. About &#036;129. Dan

  2. #12
    lee
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    I have a Metrolux II that has a metronome in it and it has programable channels and also offers a shutter checker and a small densitometer. maybe a little overkill but it is the best piece of equipment in my darkroom.


    lee

  3. #13
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    It is impossible to overemphasize the absolute indispensibility of a metronome when printing. Mine drives my wife and kids nuts and I&#39;ve had to give up listening to music when I make prints, but nothing else has done more to improve my printing ability than this &#036;30 device. You&#39;ll get that back in just a couple of printing sessions from the money you save on paper alone.

    Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee use a metronome to make their contact prints and Ansel Adams always used one to make his enlargements. Try it and you&#39;ll know why.
    Jim

  4. #14
    Cem
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    Gralab 300 is not accurate enough for repeatability, especially for short times. You should go with a digital timer.
    I use a Kearsarge 301, and highly recommend it: built like tank, very simple logical design, has everything i need, and more importantly nothing i don&#39;t need. This thing must be designed by someone who actually prints.
    I use a Gralab 300 for film development, moving hands are perfect for inversions. And i actually have a third timer, Gralab 451, in the tray area. This allows 2 different sequential time programming, so everytime i press "start", it alternates between developer and fixer time.
    This whole arrangement may seem like overkill, but when one spends a lot of time in the dark, anything that saves time and frustration pays off. Everything stays in its place and ready to use.
    Cem Topdemir

  5. #15
    Ole
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    Interesting split here, between the superautomatic and metronome users...

    I vote for metronome myself; I had used one for years before I discovered Ansel Adams did the same. If it was good enough for him, it&#39;s certainly good enough for me&#33;
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #16

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    I used an electric metronome for several years but have had a series of electronic timers lately. My printing times are usually less than 10 seconds, so I need to count in tenths of a second, which the electronic gadgets do very well. With the metronome, I could get only about a half-second accuracy. Surprisingly, a couple tenths of a second make a significant difference in a print that takes only a few seconds over all.

  7. #17

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    I&#39;m glad to read that last entry by Michael... I thought I was the only oddball in the world doing this.

    I never use a timer, I count. The metronome is set at 1 second intervals. Turn on the enlarging light and hold a card under the lens. Move it away to expose the paper and count. When you&#39;re done exposing, move the card over the lens and turn the light off. Good for enlarging and contact printing, test strips - everything. Edge burning for enlargements is especially easy doing this.

    I leave the thing beeping the whole time I&#39;m working. You&#39;d think the sound would drive you crazy, but it&#39;s nice. It&#39;s comforting. Do this about 6 times and you won&#39;t be able to use a timer again... maybe.

    I bought mine in a music store for about &#036;20.00. It&#39;s electronic&#33;

    Anthony - Fine Art Photo Supply

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