Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,915   Posts: 1,556,367   Online: 1009
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cambridge, MA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    895

    Stability of using 4x5 Enlargers to Print 4x5 Negatives

    I'm planning a darkroom and expect to be printing negatives from size 35mm to size 4x5 (but not larger).

    I can definitively state that I do not expect to be making prints larger than 16x20 in size and 99.9% of my prints will probably be 11x14 or smaller.

    Is it reasonable to expect that most 4x5 enlargers will have sufficient stability (if properly assembled, etc.) to print high-qualiity 4x5 negatives in these sizes?

    General guidance on particularly stable 4x5 enlargers would also be welcome.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Sparky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,100
    what other type of enlarger would you propose to use??

    DeVere's and Dursts are particularly stable. To my mind - all enlargers should be properly braced as well - involving drilling the column to run wires with turnbuckles on them - at a diagonal to the column geometry and going to the closes structural tie point (ceiling joist, stud, whatever).

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Floriduh
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,272
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by aldevo View Post

    Is it reasonable to expect that most 4x5 enlargers will have sufficient stability (if properly assembled, etc.) to print high-qualiity 4x5 negatives in these sizes?

    Thanks.
    Supposing of course that you can provide the high quality negatives as mentioned, I don't think you'll have a problem.

  4. #4
    Lopaka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    759
    4x5 enlargers are generally large and heavy so pretty stable by definition. I have my 4x5 LPL wall-mounted so it won't move unless there is an earthquake. The Omega and Besselers that have angled columns can either be mounted to the counter on the bottom or make a wall mount with steel angles. The top should be braced to the wall as mentioned above.

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  5. #5
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,830
    I had initially planned to anchor the column of my ancient DeJur 4x5 enlarger top and bottom to the wall. It has proven stable enough, just sitting on a table, to do O.K. for 20 years without anchoring. A Testrite 4x5 hidden away in the attic wouldn't be stable if the column was anchored. One might try out an enlarger before making permanent installations.

    Supporting the column entirely from the wall has the advantage of permitting raising and lowering the easel height as well as the enlarger head. This can be convenient when making larger prints, especially under a low ceiling.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Toulouse, France
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    527
    Dear Aldevo,
    I think you judge 4x5 enlarger using the amateur model enlarger scheme.
    It is true that a lot of amateur aimed enlargers are unstable, with poorly designed columns and vibrate during printing if you breathe looking at them. They were designed with cost as the criteria, not sturdiness, nor quality.
    The 4x5 market was designed for professionals, and priced as such new. These people can pay a premium price IF and only IF the stuff they buy is worth the money. Add to this they knew how to judge...
    What I can tell is that my durst Laborator 1000 which is very old, has seen professional use for years is so stable that I do not need to re-focus even after a week without use. Just drop a negative in the film holder, turn the lamp on, et voila ! Of course I double check for focus, but I'm surprised that the head has not moved, even unlocked !
    If you plan to crop some of your negatives, you might consider hanging the enlarger to the wall in order to move the easel under the column. Otherwise, you'll had to buy a large 4 blade easel and move the printing paper in one corner of the easel, using the 4 blades to have the correct margins you want, without hitting the column.
    I do not know any 4x5 enlarger with a film carrier opening greater than 4x5.
    Hope this helps !

  7. #7
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,553
    Images
    15
    It would also depend on where the darkroom was. If the enlarger was unstable you wouldn't own it but if you did and you anchored it to the floor or wall in a basement you might be OK. If you anchored it to a floor or wall in a second or third story room of an old building next to a railroad track you might have a problem. Or if kids were jumping up and down in the room next door there might be a problem. Sometimes the more secure to the structure the more it picks up vibrations. Enlargers are made with stability in mind although some have more mass than others. It depends on the mechanics of the enlarger and the environment it is in. How stable is the camera and tripod you take into the field and what precautions do you take there to ensure stability?
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Eastern, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,020
    Images
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by aldevo View Post
    I'm planning a darkroom and expect to be printing negatives from size 35mm to size 4x5 (but not larger).

    I can definitively state that I do not expect to be making prints larger than 16x20 in size and 99.9% of my prints will probably be 11x14 or smaller.

    Is it reasonable to expect that most 4x5 enlargers will have sufficient stability (if properly assembled, etc.) to print high-qualiity 4x5 negatives in these sizes?

    General guidance on particularly stable 4x5 enlargers would also be welcome.

    Thanks.
    g'day aldevo
    why all the limitations and stressing? relax and just it a try

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    My Beseler is heavier then me

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    421
    My darkroom is in the cellar with a cement floor. For more than 24 years my D-2 was bolted to the table and bolted with turnbuckels to the overhead floor joists. I now have a Durst 138 that's also bolted with turnbuckels.

    If your working in a kitchen or bathroom, that's one thing. If you have a permanent darkroom, why not bolt it up?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin