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  1. #1
    El Gringo's Avatar
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    Burning in skies with complicated horizons

    I'm not that experienced with darkroom intricacies but I thought I was getting better as far as dodging and burning go, until I came to the attached image. I can't for the life of me burn in the sky (which needs an extra 10 secs on top of the base exposure) without leaving the bright halos around the edge of the two main rock formations.

    In my latest attempts I have cut a bit of card in the same shape as the line between the sky and the rest of the scene and have got slightly better results than before, but I;m still not happy. Is there something I am doing wrong or do I just need more practice with this kind of thing?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails balancedrock8x10small.jpg  
    Rhys

  2. #2
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    You might try flashing the paper which affects the highlights with little impact on mid-tones and shadows.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  3. #3
    scootermm's Avatar
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    perhaps try cutting out the shape of the foreground, but slightly smaller.... I would imagine, and from my experience, that when you mask an area thats exactly the same size it will create the halos. Try out cutting a shape maybe 1-2cm smaller than the area to be masked and then slightly move it around while the 10sec burning is going on.

    that may help limit the haloing.

  4. #4
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    Are you moving the card during the exposure? It looks like you just placed it over the paper and left it during the exposure.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  5. #5
    rmolson's Avatar
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    burning a complicated area

    I don't know if there is any scientific validity but I usually burn the backgrounds first and depending on effect often with a lower contrast filter, and then the main exposure. It seems to over print any of my errors in the edges of the back ground burn

  6. #6
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I think you'll get the best result with the pre-flashing technique. There are a number of threads here on APUG that discuss it, and other web resources as well as books that go into that technique. Another thing you can try is to divide up the area that needs burning in into segments, and do your burn in multiple steps. Something else some people try is to fully develop the print (ie give the print even a bit longer than you're used to - 3 mins instead of 2, etc), then before fixing, have a tray of full-strength developer sitting by, and swabbing full-strength (non-diluted) developer onto the areas you need to bring out. Let that sit for another two to three minutes, then rinse, stop, and fix as normal. You can also warm up the second developer tray so the chemistry is even more active. Don't run it too hot or it will exhaust itself in the tray.

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    One option is to make a contrast mask in register with the negative. Donald Miller has done quite a bit of this and discusses it in some threads (search on "contrast mask"). Ctein offers a good discussion of the procedure in his book _Post-Exposure_.

    One of the reasons I like albumen printing, is that it is self-masking and handles just this sort of situation easily. Albumen is a bit labor intensive, but any printing-out process, like Centennial POP or Ziatype has this property. You don't mention what format the original negative is, but it wouldn't be too difficult to get a packet of Centennial POP and try it out. If the original is too small, you can make an enlarged negative on ortho film by first making an enlarged interpositive as you would make a print (maybe a little darker than you would print), and then contact print the interpositive to another sheet to make the enlarged negative. It could take a couple of tries to get the contrast right in the enlarged negative for POP, but the results should prove worth the effort.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  8. #8

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    Try stopping down the lens to increase overall exposure time then b&d. This will give you a smoother transition.

    Doyle
    It is easier to gain enlightenment than to explain enlightenment.
    Supreme Master Ching Hai

  9. #9

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    Rest the card on a thick book (or even two) when you draw the outline before cutting around it. That will compensate for the cone of light that centres on your enlarging lens. If you draw it on the baseboard, it won't natch when you hold it above the paper at the right height for dodging.

  10. #10
    wilsonneal's Avatar
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    I also find that split-filter techniques with multigrade paper cut down a bit on the amount of b and d that must be done. There are several threads discussing this technique.

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