Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,573   Posts: 1,545,686   Online: 799
      
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Berkeley, Ca.
    Posts
    178
    A little background: I too just got my new Analyizer Pro just 2dys ago, and just set up this darkroom last week upgrading from a B22 to D5 with dichrohead in my new home after a 3yr hiatus. So this darkroom and enlarger are both entirely new to me. I had to use an outdoor 8x10 shed that's supplied by extension cords. And I'm having fluctuating light output *at times*. Just every now and then when all of a sudden the light output increases ruining the final print as you'd expect. I only have the dichro head, and the power supply, not the voltage stabilizer. I'm thinking this is the problem,but I read, on photo.net that someone with similar problems disappeared w. the addition of real outlets. So maybe my problem is the whole darkroom is fed by an ext. cord, to another extension cord and strips for multiple outlets?? I need to decide what to do. B&H has used Omega volt stabilizers for used $175! Yowsa! But no way can I add a real outlet out there easily. So I'd hope it's not that.

    Anyway, anyone with any ideas what maybe the culprit?? I also read, but can't confirm, that Uninterupted Power Supply units, like sold at Office Depot does the same thing for less $. Seems fishy though.

    Thanks alot!

    Chris


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    The problem that you are experiencing may very well be due to the manner in which you are supplying your enlarger. The devices that are sold at computer stores are suspect in my opinion, they are more directed to controlling voltage spikes which are the other side of the equation from what you are experiencing. I have an Omega voltage stabilizer that I used on my old Omega D2 with an Aristo cold light source and I would be hard put to suggest that it's use would solve your problem. The things that I would do, if I were you, would be to try and solve this problem as simply and inexpensively as possible. The first thing that I would do is supply your enlarger with a source from your house (I assume) that has as few outlets on the circuit as possible. Certainly not a circuit that has a refrigerator, freezer, or furnace on the circuit. The second thing that I would do is to be assured that my extension cord be a minimum of 12 awg conducter. The third thing if that does not alleviate your problem would be to have an electrician wire a dedicated outlet fed from the breaker mains. But be sure that you don't indicate to him what you are using it for (he doesn't need to know) other then that you need a 20 amp breaker on the circuit. The reason that I mention this is that what you are doing is not in keeping with the universal electrical code. I have spent the last 30 years involved with this sort of thing. All by way of information.

    Regards,
    Donald Miller
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    97
    I think that Donald Miller is very irresponsible in encouraging Chris to ignore the local electrical regulations.
    As an electrical engineer with 54 years experience I strongly advise Chris to hire a qualified electrician to do the job properly and insist that he fit earth leakage protection to the system at the house end of the supply.
    Being in the UK I cannot quote the relevant regulations for him but the earth leakage protection is termed " A Residual Current Detecter" they are not cheap but it is better than lying dead on the floor of the shed.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Berkeley, Ca.
    Posts
    178
    Well, didn't mean to start anything hehe I actually ran last year to code, a dedicated 240A to my larger shed (no garage) for my table saw and other woodworking equip. Then I just this yr set up the smaller shed for more space. I can certainly put another line in, read alot of work, but I'm using this part-time and the rest of the time, it's storage for garden equip. and camping gear. So I don't really need electricity out there exc. for the darkroom. But I agree with the safety issue as well. I'll try isolating the enlarger from the rest...good idea. And if this doesn't fix it I may ditch the idea and go back to the bathroom idea (this is a 1bath house no less and why I wanted to use the shed lol) But I'm not excited about that prospect.

    Thanks for the suggestions,
    Chris

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    To my esteemed colleague from the United Kingdom, I assure you that what I was suggesting is in no way unsafe and in light of the fact that all residential service within the United States, if he took the time to check, would require grounded service. Furthermore the correct term, for the next time, that he wants to address the issue for those of us in the United States is a "Ground Fault Interrupter".
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    747
    GFIs wouldn't add much to the cost if you're already having the electrician come out. Would it? I'd bet most of the cost is going to be labour either way. GFI receptacles aren't alot of money.

    A high quality UPS will output very clean power. The problem is a high quality one won't be cheap. I think the better ones only use the wall power to charge the onboard battery that then feeds the UPS outlet. I did a google search and a small one outputting a true sinewave is close to $300.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin