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  1. #11

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    I always use a hair dryer (usually on high, as I'm too impatient to wait!) after a quick wash, to dry a test strip, then I look at it under various lighting conditions. I usually display my prints under fairly bright lights, so I use something close to the final viewing conditions to judge my test print, then adjust accordingly, if req'd. This is mostly for fibre, as I find the dry down on the RC paper isn't as much but sometimes its' necessary if its' a tricky subject.
    If I'm making changes, or printing other very similar negs, I'll put the test in a tray of water near my fix, so that I've got a ready reference for what I want, and its' wet, so I don't have to guess as much.
    Keith

  2. #12
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmnut View Post
    If I'm making changes, or printing other very similar negs, I'll put the test in a tray of water near my fix, so that I've got a ready reference for what I want, and its' wet, so I don't have to guess as much.
    Keith
    Keith, spend a couple of hours testing your papers for drydown and you'll never have to go through the process you describe above ever again. I started testing for drydown about 25 years ago and check out the drydown of the current papers I use perhaps once every year.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean View Post
    Keith, spend a couple of hours testing your papers for drydown and you'll never have to go through the process you describe above ever again. I started testing for drydown about 25 years ago and check out the drydown of the current papers I use perhaps once every year.
    Les, do you find that the drydown value varies much from batch to batch of the same paper?

  4. #14
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Just for the record R/C prints are not effected by drydown as they do not shrink on drying, although a wet print will look different to a dry one.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  5. #15
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHannon View Post
    Les, do you find that the drydown value varies much from batch to batch of the same paper?

    I have not found that to be the case John, for example Ilford Warmtone Fibre had a drydown of 11% when Ilford first introduced it. The last time I tested it about 12 months ago it was still 11%. I have been tempted many times to publish my drydown figures but the test is so simple that I believe that it is best for everyone to do it and arrive at their own conclusions.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean View Post
    I have not found that to be the case John, for example Ilford Warmtone Fibre had a drydown of 11% when Ilford first introduced it. The last time I tested it about 12 months ago it was still 11%. I have been tempted many times to publish my drydown figures but the test is so simple that I believe that it is best for everyone to do it and arrive at their own conclusions.
    Thanks Les!

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller View Post
    Just for the record R/C prints are not effected by drydown as they do not shrink on drying, although a wet print will look different to a dry one.
    Dave. That's what I had always assumed and yet I have just looked at the article mentioned in Circle of the Sun and he mentions Ilford Cooltone RC at 7% and Kodak(RIP) Polycontrast IV RC at 8%. I think all the others on the list are FB.

    So is this valid and is there a way of accounting for drydown in exactly the sem way as for FB? Clearly there is a difference between a wet and dry print but I can't say that I had spotted the dry down effect with RC. Maybe that's because I wasn't looking for it or my printer's eye is still at early apprentice level.

    On the other hand if RC prints are effected by it then knowing what to do about it may be worthwhile. At 7 and 8% respectively it seems hardly to be inconsequential. At least not in Dektol. Maybe with Ilford Developer it is inconsequential.

    It goes without saying that others with first hand knowledge should please feel free to speak as well.

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The Polymax RC N surface I am using (until it is gone) definitely dries darker. I don't know if the effect is due to something different then the dry down effect experienced when using FB papers, but it certainly is obvious.

    Matt

  9. #19
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    I have been using copious amounts of RC paper, mainly Ilford MGIV Pearl; I find that there is a very slight dry down effect.

    The way the print is dried also has an effect, slight, but still there.

    I have a heated RC paper, roller dryer, which means I have a wet to dry 8x10 print in about 34 seconds. Prints dried this way seem to retain their luminosity better, I cannot explain it any other way.

    When I hang wet prints up to dry and then compare an air dried print with a Roller heater dried print, the force dried print wins out by a poofteenth. The force dried prints seem to have a slight sparkle, that is only available in an air dried print by pulling exposure by 1/12 of a stop.

    In my own darkroom with my current MGIV RC paper stock, I know I need to pull a wet print by 1/16 of a stop if it is going to be air dried.

    When doing large batch printing, which can be anything from 20 to 500 or more prints off the same neg, I keep a print under water in a dish, so I can do a quick running check after another load of prints have hit the fixer.

    I quickly pull the reference print out with my left hand and pull one of the latest prints out with tongs, then check them side by side.

    Mick.

  10. #20
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    With respect to R/C prints I accept that there is a visual difference between wet and dry prints, more so with matt than gloss finishes. As with FB paper we print for the effect seen on a dry paper; unless we intend displaying our work in the shower.
    Because it is so quick to dry R/C paper it had never occurred to me that anyone would want to compare a wet R/C print with a dry one. With FB and it's much longer drying time the problem is real; unless one resorts to frying one's paper in a microwave we are left, at the very best, trying to compare a damp print with a dry one. The method of drying FB, as with R/C will also have a marked effect on the finished print, so as ever consistency is needed to achieve the results you are happy with.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


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