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Thread: print sizes

  1. #11
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    I can’t help with your easel problem since I am unfamiliar with the model you have.
    With regard to print size there are a number of considerations. Among them Cost, smaller prints are cheaper. Viewing distance, how close will the viewer be to the finished print? In the hand or on the wall? Format, what shape best suits the image? Don't be constrained by negative or paper format.
    For myself, after producing test strips and deciding on exposure, and contrast my first full frame test print is made on a 10x8 R/C Kentmere sheet. If I consider it worth proceeding I will then play around with cropping ideas, and burning/dodging requirements, and may make further R/C prints to try out my ideas. Final display prints will be made on suitable 5x7, 10x8, and 16x12 FB paper using the adjusted information from the R/C prints.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  2. #12

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    Dear t_al_z,

    Search ebay for a nice 4 blade easel. They are rather inexpensive in 11x14 and smaller. You can then easily center your image.

    Neal Wydra

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    All of my prints are made with fixed border easels (Speed-Ez-El brand)...

    ...A set of Speed-Ez-Els may be fairly expensive, but they are nearly foolproof and last forever. They've been around for generations, and are usually available used.
    Speed Ez-Els are certainly near fool proof and they do last forever. Over the years I've acquired quite the collection of them, from 4x5 to 11x14. There's even one that crops an 8x10 sheet down to perfect full frame 35 proportions. They're great for quick proofs, or for when you want to make multiple copies of the same print. There's no way to change the borders, so they're pretty much a one trick pony. I wonder why they never made one for 4x6? I'd use it.

    Two bladed easels are economical, but like the Speed-Ez-Els, they lack flexibility because two edges of the print effectively have fixed borders. The four bladed easels are the best, since they allow complete freedom of image placement on the paper. They are also the most expensive option. They are also usually of much better construction than 2 bladed easels and are easily adjustable should they go out of square. Like the man said, you get what you pay for.

    Forget the rulers on most two bladed easels. They might as well have been written by a novelist - pure fiction. The only way to get even borders with them is to make a template on an appropriately sized scrap of paper and use it to set the blades.

  4. #14

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    11x14 paper is the largest size which is relatively easy to handle (16x20 is just too big and floppy). And I like to leave a little margin, so my usual size is 8"x12" on 11x 14" paper. Actually, the height depends on the exact cropping, but the 12" width is pretty consistant.
    To make prints as large as 16x20 (or actually 12x18 on 16x20 paper) from 35mm negatives, everyting has to be just right, and it's really quite tricky to do.

  5. #15
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    I would avoid 6x4s for that very reason because photo labs use this size as standard. 8x6 on a 10x8 sheet of paper is a method I would often use for 35mm. The large border looks great.

    For medium format, everything is square, so 7x7 (10x8 paper) or 10x10 (12x16) with a decent 1 inch border.

    A good heavy easel will save you lots of time and frustration. I use a sturdy Photon Beard 20x16 2 blade easel, which allows up to 2 inch borders.

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