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  1. #11
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Most of those old glass negatives were shot for densities using albumen paper. DR for albumen is 2.2 and even denser....way to dense for normal silver papers or even azo. But the tonal range for a good albumen print can be amazing. Beautiful stuff.

  2. #12
    RobertP's Avatar
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    Also a collodion negative can be intensified after it has been developed and fixed to increase the densities to the desired level. So a decent photographer with some experience didn't have to nail the exposure and development right on. They could intensify the negative after development and fixing to reach the desired density. With a little practice they could get these pretty close visually for albumen printing.

  3. #13

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    Hello Timo,

    Can you tell from the subject matter roughly what period it is? Gelatin dry plates were produced about 20 years after wet plate, and were in general use by the 1880s - 1890s and lasted well into the 20th century, so you'll encounter many more dry plate negs than wet plate ones.

    I recently got a lot of old glass negatives which looked dense compared to my film negatives, but turned out not to have enough contrast to produce a satisfactory contact print on centennial POP, however they printed surprisingly well on ilford multigrade without having to take any special measures at all.

    I look forward to hearing about your results!

    Regards,
    Neil.

  4. #14

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    I also confess that I scan them. Might it be possible to make an interneg on slide copying film though?

    David.

  5. #15
    hka
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    Some time ago I did it also for a friend and layed down the glass negatives on top of the 4x5" carrier of my LPL enlager. It works fine and resulted in "great" prints.
    harry

    Release, the best you can do...

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgomena View Post
    At the Oregon Historical Society, our head photographer prints glass negatives all the time. He uses a really old 8x10" enlarger (originally built to handle glass plates) that is converted to a modern cold-light diffusion light source. Everything is printed on Ilford multigrade paper. Paper developer is Dektol or the equivalent. He makes excellent exhibition prints. He also makes contact prints using the same paper and chemicals. No problem at all -- have fun! Old negs can make beautiful prints, as Robert said above. (Hi, Robert!)

    Pete Gomena
    I've done exactly the same thing myself with some old glass plate negatives lent to me by a friend. Printed on Adorama's house brand or variable contrast, resin coated paper using an Omega D series enlarger with a Dichro head, and developed in Dektol. I made a negative carrier from a couple of pieces of cardboard to hold the negatives. Attached are a couple of samples. So yes, it can be done and it's no different than printing an acetate negative.
    Last edited by fschifano; 03-09-2009 at 07:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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