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  1. #21

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    Honestly, if you buy a 6 lenses design by a reputable maker and if this lens has not suffered abuse, you won't see the difference.
    Enlarger lenses design and formulas are "standard" since a long time so any maker willing to produce a good lens can do it. Quality in workmanship and quality control is another matter.
    So if the first lens you get is not good enough, lurk for another one and sell that dog.
    A friend of mine has once made side by side comparison on average size enlargement of Schneider and Rodenstock versus Nikon lenses. He was obliged to label each prints in order to differentiate them.... Of course if you plan to make murals the situation will be a little different !

  2. #22
    mrtoml's Avatar
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    Thanks again, Georges. I don't expect to print many things greater than 16x20. I guess 11x14 would be my standard sort of size with not many images going past 12x16.

  3. #23

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    I guess in fairness to all I have a dumb question or two myself.... I have longed for a darkroom of my own since college, thanks to the digital explosion ( the only good to come of it for me) is the availability of low cost dark room equipment. I have put together a darkroom. I have a bessler 45. I shhot large format 4x5, medium format 6x7 and 35mm. Shooting is easy, developing film is easy. Enlarging.... where do I begin?? polycontrast papers??? If I don't use filters, what happens? Are there papers that have a fix contrast, requiring no filters? Does using filters in the enlarging process yield the same type of results that one getrs when using filters on a camera for getting contrast. I only shoot B&W. In college I don't recall ever using a filter on the enlarger. All the books I have read talk about using them but don't talk about not using them. So how do I proceed?
    Thanks

  4. #24

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    More "dumb" questions on filter use

    Finally have a darkroom set up. In college we never used filters when enlarging. That was a long time ago...... Now everything I read talks about Variable contrast papers and filter use. I'm clueless. What happens if I don't use filters? Are there papers that don't require filter use? Just how do I proceed?

    Thanks!

  5. #25

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    Yes you can get fixed contrast paper. VC paper is actually grade #2 if you don't use filters.

    No it's different then using on camera filters.

    Really contrast filters aren't that hard to use. It's easier to have a box of VC paper and a set of filters then a box of grade #1,#2,#3 and #4.

  6. #26
    Brian Jeffery's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrtoml View Post
    T
    The stuff he says about using glass in the carrier is interesting. I assume that I can get glass carriers for the 7700. I will start another search. :rolleyes:
    If you don't mind buying new then try Firstcall and Nova Darkroom. If you're going to use a glass carrier then I would definitely recommend the anti-newton ring glass as well, but be careful as I was supplied with ordinary glass in an Anti-Newton ring box. The correct glass has a slightly mottled appearance on one side.


    Brian

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena View Post
    Yes you can get fixed contrast paper. VC paper is actually grade #2 if you don't use filters.

    No it's different then using on camera filters.

    Really contrast filters aren't that hard to use. It's easier to have a box of VC paper and a set of filters then a box of grade #1,#2,#3 and #4.
    How do I know which filter to use with any given VC paper? What is it that the filter is doing to the paper? Increasing/decreasing contrast?

  8. #28
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philm View Post
    How do I know which filter to use with any given VC paper? What is it that the filter is doing to the paper? Increasing/decreasing contrast?
    VC filters run in grades, typically 00,0,1,2,3,4,5, from softest, to very hard. There are usually 14 filters to a set as they include 1/2 grades, like 2 1/2, for instance. VC paper is coated with two emulsions (sort of), high contrast, and low contrast. The emulsions are more and less sensitive to the different colors of light that the filters produce. This allows you to alter contrast by altering the color of the light. It's more simple in practice than in theory. VC papers are similar enough in their response that grade 2 (right in the middle) is where most persons might start with a "normal" negative. You make a test print, and then select a grade offering more or less contrast, based on how you liked the test, and make a print using that one. Repeat until you get what you want. After some practice, you'll often select the correct filter on the first or second try, just by looking at the neg. Those with color heads can use a chart to determine settings that emulate the filter colors, by combining yellow and magenta light. If you don't want to use filters, you can use graded papers, that have an inherent contrast built in to them, according to their grade. There are tricks to alter a specific graded papers contrast to some degree. Most photographers who use graded papers tailor their negatives specifically for the paper they prefer to print on. VC offers more solutions if you are still getting a handle on exposure and developing.
    Last edited by JBrunner; 10-16-2007 at 10:16 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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