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  1. #11
    david b's Avatar
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    I too think it looks rather good.

    But, I might try warm, almost hot water and a q-tip.

  2. #12
    brummelisa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by david b View Post
    I too think it looks rather good.

    But, I might try warm, almost hot water and a q-tip.
    You lost me there. How should I use the hot water and q-tip?

    / Marcus

  3. #13
    Dietmar Wolf's Avatar
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    Book I can recommend:
    Black&White Photographic Printing Workshop from Larry Bartlett & Jon Tarrant.

    Many many examples how to burn, dodge, bring details up etc. This is really a must for printing and is cheap. I got mine over abebooks from USA.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by brummelisa View Post
    You lost me there. How should I use the hot water and q-tip?

    / Marcus
    You can also use warm stock developer and a Q tip or small spong, as the print developes swap the are you want to punch up with warm stock developer to increase contrast. In the old days some newpaper printers kept stock developer on a hot plate.

  5. #15
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    Have you tried split contrast printing?

    For a print like the one you posted, I would do a test strip (I usually use a full sheet of paper) at grade ~5 (200M) to determine the proper density for the blacks. The second test sheet is exposed at grade 5 for the time determined in the first test strip. Then I expose it a second time with grade 0 (200Y) in test strip fashion to determine the highlight exposure.

    By dong this, you can get a good sense about dodging and burning. That is why I like to use full sheets because I often discover areas that could be dodged/burned with either filter to affect local contrast. In a portrait I try to carefully balance the density of skin with the grade 0 filter but sometimes clothing, eyes, hair, etc. need a bit of punch from the grae 5 filter.
    Jerold Harter MD

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willie Jan View Post
    Wasn't the scene as this photo shows it?
    Score one for fidelity. Dan

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