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  1. #1
    brummelisa's Avatar
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    Change local contrast, how?

    Hi,

    I just wonder how you guys change the local contrast in an image.

    Let say that I have printed this image with grade 2.5.
    But I want some more black in the boy's pants, but I don't want just to burn because the white may be destroyed.

    So, would you do the whole image with 2.5 and then burn with a higher grade or would you dodge his pants for let say 1/3 of the time and then change filter to a higher grade and then do the rest of the time with higher filter (and maybe increase the time because the filter requires it?

    Or would you dodge the pants totally and then burn with a higher grade?

    / Marcus
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails william.jpg  

  2. #2

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    Swapping filter grades is the way I've done it.

    Don't think you need to totally dodge the pants.

    Hard to judge from a digital jpeg on a computer screen, but looking at your attachment makes me think you're obsessing. The pants are not the important detail of the image, so a viewer will over look whether a 2 1/2 filter makes the pants a 'little' gray.

    You may simply want to pop a 4 filter in, and give the pants a little burn to punch up any blacks in the pants. The 4 filter is dense enough not to effect the lighter areas of the pants during a short burn.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  3. #3
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    The image tone looks fine to me. I wouldn't change the contrast.

    Wasn't the scene as this photo shows it?
    If you want something else,wait until the sun is gone or move him to a shadow part....

  4. #4
    Leon's Avatar
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    keep the image as you have printed it if that's how you like it, then burn the trousers at grade 5 after carrying out a test strip to get the right amount - the use of the grade 5 is unlikely to effect the highlight tones in the trousers, but will definitely change the mid tones there. be careful not to overspill the burn onto the back group though or it will become too obvious.

  5. #5
    brummelisa's Avatar
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    Thanks for your replies. Maybe I should say that the image was just an example. I just wonder how you increase the contrast locally.

    Do you give a burst with 4 or 5 or do you hold back the light a bit and then increase with let say 3 or 4 if a 2 was said as normal filter

    / Marcus

  6. #6
    brummelisa's Avatar
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    The thing is that I have started to think that many times one burn a bit extra to get the black more black, but on the same time the white will be blacker too. So shouldn't one instead of burn use more contrast locally (now speaking generally)?

    / Marcus

  7. #7
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    Marcus

    I think you have already explained a good technique.

    Main exposure for the boys skin, dodge slightly in the main exposure the pants and then burn in with 4 or 5 filter to bring out the details.
    Just isolate the area you want to pop or soften , do a bit of a dodge, and then change the filter, add a diffuser if you want , put a texture screen over the area if you want and then burn in.

    This is the beauty of VC paper, with its ablity to split print and locally adjust contrasts or effects.

  8. #8

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    Change the pants and shoot again!! (Just kidding). I would go with Bob Carnie. If you don't dodge in the main exposure too much (and you probably don't want to), and you don't hit it too hard with #4 (or even #5) it should blend ok.

    Try it - just work with that area on a test strip size paper till you get it right. Do several at a time with different times per filter (mark them in pencil on the back to keep track of times) then develop them all at once.

  9. #9

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    g'day brum

    you already know the techniques, just give them a try, develop your own aesthetic

    learn not just the techniques but more importantly when to use the techniques

    it doesn't need to be complicated

    in fact in the attached image the pants detail is not the obvious problem

    the most glaring and obvious contrast/detail problem with this image is the bright tree trunks in the background, they draw the eye from the boy, worrying about the pants detail does nothing to overcome that

    Ray

  10. #10
    brummelisa's Avatar
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    Thanks again for your replies.

    Ray: The image is always different in other people eyes. I like the bright trees because they are vertical and bright and so is the boy.

    But anyway I will try to change the contrast locally (in another picture).

    / Marcus

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