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  1. #11

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    I remember awhile ago when a student kept having faint, white fingerprints on her prints. I told him to wash her hands because she may have had some lotion or other oil on them. But no matter how many times she did this, she still got fingerprints.

    Then I saw her using her dodging tool with plasticene on it. (Her father told her about that handy hint.) She was reshaping the tool or just touching it every time and that was depositing oil on them.

    Once I figured it out, the fingerprints disappeared.

  2. #12
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Yes, I remember quite fondly playing with plasticine, in fact I purchased a box of plasticine for all of my sisters children as they were growing up.

    This is the correct spelling, I looked at a box of it in the darkroom.

    Mick.

  3. #13
    Philippe-Georges's Avatar
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    Plasticine is a wonderful tool in the studio too, I use it to hold the props when table top shooting or temporarily fixing any kind things...
    "...If you can not stand the rustle of the leafs, then do not go in to the woods..."
    (freely translated quote by Guido Gezelle)

    PS: English is only my third language, please do forgive me my sloppy grammar...

  4. #14

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    Check this link for a little history on plasticine.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasticine

    Seems to be more common in Commonwealth countries. We used it a lot when we were kids before play-doh arrived on the scene.

    Gord

  5. #15

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    Gromit and Gumby

    Surely someone watches Wallace and Gromit.

    Cheers,
    Clarence

    I once had an employee who appeared at her job interview wearing a Gumby University T-shirt. She got the job.

  6. #16
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Egan View Post
    You had a seriously deprived childhood! Plasticene of many colours was a favourite in kindergartens across Australia.
    We used to get it in a flat packet with 1" strips of various colours. The first thing my brother and myself would do though is mix it all together until it was a uniform brown colour then make model snakes out of it.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  7. #17
    johnnywalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Egan View Post
    You had a seriously deprived childhood! Plasticene of many colours was a favourite in kindergartens across Australia. My parents were teachers so there was always buckets of the stuff lying around in my youth. (I'm sure there is a US equivalent with a different name.) Think of a less sticky version of Blu-Tack which by the way is also a good alternative for shaping a small dodging tool.
    It was "plasticene" in Canada when I was a kid, pre-"pleistocene".
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  8. #18
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Plasticene is modelling clay in the US. It also comes in 1inch square strips in various colours(red yellow blue green). The stuff of dinosaur dioramas and stuff like that. Some of the colours seem to stain quite badly too besides being oily so I'm not sure if I'd want the stuff around.

    Signed,

    the US expat living in the UK.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  9. #19
    Tony Egan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    We used to get it in a flat packet with 1" strips of various colours. The first thing my brother and myself would do though is mix it all together until it was a uniform brown colour then make model snakes out of it.Steve.
    I remember doing the same. Rolling it on a flat surface and creating a really sharp pointy end was popular. Also making handlebar moustaches and walking around with them wedged between the top lip and nose. Cutting it into slices with a wooden ruler etc. etc. I seem to recall it coming in packets shaped a bit like crayons in Australia?
    Gee, if only we had been brought up with a PS2, imagine how much more creative and well-adjusted we would be today!

  10. #20

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    WTH is Plasticene

    Thanks guys-I was in the era (WWII) when playdoh was not in my childhood, however we did have something called modeling clay.

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