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  1. #21

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    Modeling clay(platiscene) has the advantage of not drying out like Play-doh. Most craft shops like Hobby Lobby or Michels have it.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  2. #22

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    Ah Plasticine. I must have bought or had bought for me about 10 tons of it in the late 40s/early 50s.Probably ingested a fair bit as well and still alive. It came in several colours but by the time I had constructed the Mona Lisa or the bust of Plato it all ended up mixing into a uniform grey. Always a few sticks in a Xmas stocking. Available from any Woolworth's store and all good modelling shops. In the dark winter nights it was my main source of amusement and education. That and Dick Barton Special Agent on the wireless. Anybody old UK APUGers remember Dick Barton?

    Anyway back to the subject. Good as plasticine was for modelling, I'd use what in the UK is described as Blu-tack. It's an office supplymaterial, used to stick cards and paper to walls or boards but which is easily taken off without leaving any residue. It's non oily and can easily be modelled to any shape. It's especially good for small dodging when placed on the end of a paperclip or other wire.

    pentaxuser

  3. #23
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    This is all quite interesting but here is one thing overlooked here....

    During the war, we had plasticene envelopes due to a paper shortage. Now this obviously could not be the plastic material described so far. Plasticene in one form was thin and translucent or in another form white and opaque. It gradually stiffened with time and would eventually disintegrate when flexed. It would shatter into little flakes. I can rememeber that they resembled snowflakes.

    Anyone remember plasticene envelopes?

    PE

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    This is all quite interesting but here is one thing overlooked here....

    During the war, we had plasticene envelopes due to a paper shortage. Now this obviously could not be the plastic material described so far. Plasticene in one form was thin and translucent or in another form white and opaque. It gradually stiffened with time and would eventually disintegrate when flexed. It would shatter into little flakes. I can rememeber that they resembled snowflakes.

    Anyone remember plasticene envelopes?

    PE
    Glassine Bags or envelopes.

    Basically wax paper.

    My Grandfather was a stamp dealer (philatelist) and these were used to keep stamps in upon sale so they would stay dry.

    Still in production: http://www.google.com/products?hl=en...&um=1&ie=UTF-8

    BTW: they were the packaging of choice by, amongst others, heroin dealers - until the introduction of plastic "baggies" in the 1970's.

  5. #25
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    George;

    Yes and no. Wax paper is way more stable and pliable I think than the plasticene that I remember from the 40s.

    IDK for sure.

    PE

  6. #26
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    Plasticine is also used as synonymous with pliable, flexible etc -
    1955 K. WILLIAMS Diary 14 Dec. (1993) 118, I felt a complete lack of reality about Larry - it was indeed a theatrical Richard, with funny walk, crookback, unformed hands, and a plasticine nose. 1958 Spectator 4 July 12/1 He was so pliant, so plasticine,..so insidiously seeing it all the other chap's way. 1976 Times 28 Jan. 1/3 The Russians..would respect us more if we were led by an iron lady rather than a Plasticine man.

    (Plasticine was developed by W. Harbutt in Bath in the mid 1890s (cf. quot. 1897 at sense A.); commercial production began in 1900.)

    OED
    Bob.

  7. #27
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    The nifty stuff I used to make claymation films!
    Vincent Purcell
    Lexington KY Photographer + Media Artist
    http://vincenttpurcell.com

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by herb View Post
    Was just reading a good book written in UK about Master Class in B/W printing, and they talk about putting "plasticene" on a wire to use as a doging tool.

    Being in redneck country, we do not have a clue as to what that is, or what could be a substitute.

    Brits of the world, arise to the occasion!

    Give us poor colonials the answer!
    What? I thought everybody knew what plasticene was. It's like playdough but not salty; more rubbery. Doesn't dry out, or at least not within the attention span of your average 6 year old anyway.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
    .

  9. #29
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    Am I totally dating myself by remembering this part of the Beatles' Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds ?

    "Picture yourself on a train in a station,
    With plasticene porters with looking glass ties,
    Suddenly someone is there at the turnstyle,
    The girl with the kaleidoscope eyes."
    Last edited by copake_ham; 12-12-2007 at 07:55 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Egan View Post
    I remember doing the same. Rolling it on a flat surface and creating a really sharp pointy end was popular. Also making handlebar moustaches and walking around with them wedged between the top lip and nose. Cutting it into slices with a wooden ruler etc. etc. I seem to recall it coming in packets shaped a bit like crayons in Australia?
    A popular past time at my junior school was surreptitiously sticking huge balls of plasticine onto the school radiators. The clay would melt then harden leaving streaky solidified runs of the stuff all down the rads and pipes. Although this may sound like a terrible anti-social vandalism, we were, in fact, ensuring the employment of several cleaners/ caretakers and painters over the summer to put right the damage - which, in the high unemployment of the thatcherist early 80's, served an important role.

    A social conscience at such an early age.

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