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  1. #11
    ITD
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    Quote Originally Posted by haris View Post
    I print just "keepers", not "possibiles"
    Hmm, I'm not sure I can tell the difference from a 35mm contact print

  2. #12
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    I do my editing from looking at the film itself. I've shot and processed enough I can tell by looking at a negative if it will be something I want to try and get a good print out of. I've also got my shooting and processing method down consistently enough that I can get a good working print out of most of my negatives from a single baseline exposure. It is rare that looking at a negative you can tell exactly what spots will need burning/dodging though, so there is that need of the work print. I can get good work prints cranked out pretty quick, and my RH Designs Analyser Pro is a big help. I haven't taken the time to do the proper calibration process with it, so I still wing it a bit when it comes to test prints, but the contrast grade calculation and base exposure time calculation are a huge help, especially when it comes to making consistent, repeatable prints.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by ITD View Post
    Hmm, I'm not sure I can tell the difference from a 35mm contact print
    I ment final print. Let say I shoot 5 rolls of 35mm film. From contact sheet I chose let say 10 (sometime more, sometime less) photographs. By using Jobo ComTime I make those 10 prints, and decide "keepers" to make final prints. Usually I get one or two keepers, maximum five...

    But, whole process is few days, one day I make processing of negatives, second day for contact proofs, third for test prints, and one day for final prints, or even two days for final if print more than 5 "easy" or 1 to 3 "difficult", that is depend of time needed for prints. I don't spend more than 3 hours in darkroom.

    All test prints then go to bin I write then all informations how I made particular print on paper or on back of contact proof sheet(s) so if ever want to make another copy in future I don't have to go through all processes again...
    Last edited by haris; 12-20-2007 at 10:42 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
    No things in life should be left unfinis

  4. #14
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    my workflow is a process of elimination, or at least of refining. No, I think "distillation" is the best term. The kind intended to produce good single malt.

    Of course I develop every roll of film. Then I'll make contact sheets of every roll. As that process continues, I'll look at my contacts for possible fine prints, being relatively selective. I'll make work prints of my selections, using a standard aperture and time with no contrast filtration. Sometimes a work print is too light or soft to evaluate and must be reprinted, but normally I can see if there is enough there to pursue. Then I'll let some time pass to see which ones really stick with me. Those I will take the time with to make the best print possible. However much time it takes. And I usually limit a darkroom session to making one best print. It seems if I try to do 2, I run out of time or patience and end up doing the second one over again anyway.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  5. #15

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    Hate to say this but...

    I like scanning my negatives first - it's a pain but it's fairly quick and I can quickly tell which ones I am going to print...

    The end result isn't that good but good enough to tell me if there's potential...

  6. #16
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    If I have a larger number of prints to do from the same film, I usually have a closer look at the contact sheet, not only to select the images I want to print, but also to get a "feel" of the possible exposure corrections I need to apply. Often, this turns out to be very revealing, but it requires some experience in reviewing the contacts sheets pic's. However, it allows me to make a more educated guess of the right exposure for the next image to print, based on the comparison with the previous one printed... (I don't have an analyzer) Thus saving on the amount of test strips and prints and ultimately time...

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ITD View Post
    Hmm, I'm not sure I can tell the difference from a 35mm contact print
    One reason to use a larger format. That was one of the reasons I moved up to 6x7 and then 4x5. I could take several hundred exposures on my 35 mm system which is fine for a slide show but almost a nightmare for printing. The larger formats slow things down and make me more selective before I expose the film. When I expose a sheet of 4x5 film, I know I am committing myself to a significant amount of time developing, proofing, etc. so I get more picky.

    I would get a good loupe and start examining the negatives more than the contact sheets. Get to know what a properly exposed and processed negative looks like which are generally the ones that seem to naturally print well. Then I would force myself to generate a "top 10" of negatives to print, and finally a top 5. If you could generate 5 good prints the first weekend from the negatives you think are best, I think that would be productive.
    Jerold Harter MD

  8. #18
    ITD
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    Some really useful comments and food for thought here, thanks guys.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    One reason to use a larger format.
    Yes, that does make things much easier, but I was travelling using only public transport this year, and the MF gear coupled with a tripod was near impossible - I tried it on one of the trips, but it weighed me down far too much.


    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    I would get a good loupe and start examining the negatives more than the contact sheets. Get to know what a properly exposed and processed negative looks like which are generally the ones that seem to naturally print well. Then I would force myself to generate a "top 10" of negatives to print, and finally a top 5. If you could generate 5 good prints the first weekend from the negatives you think are best, I think that would be productive.
    Good tip, thanks.

    A follow-up question, then - do you work through your stuff strictly in order, or can you be distracted by the shiny new stuff?

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ITD View Post
    Or, how do you cope with large numbers of negatives to print? Here's my situation:

    I've been on a number of trips this year, all over Western Europe and out to some of the Greek islands. On my return, I have about 30 rolls of b&w exposed. I've developed them all and produced contact sheets. I've gone through all the contacts and selected 8-10 shots per roll that appear to warrant further investigation.

    Now comes my problem - what with cleaning negs, running test strips, washing and drying the test strips. evaluating each one and then printing, even a straight print for proofing is taking me 30 min to 1 hour.

    Is everyone else spending this sort of time? I read posts where people are making large numbers of work prints in a much shorter time, is there some shortcut that I hadn't thought of?

    So far I've had lots of time on my hands but I'm going back to work after xmas, so I'll be more pressed for time, so any suggestions (except lab printing or scanning) would be appreciated.

    Yep.. It all takes times.. I just recently started printing my own work a couple months ago. I've been developing for years but alway's had my negs scanned or printed somewhere else. Now, I'm producing contact sheets for hundreds of rolls from years back printing all my keepers (and still learning a ton in the process) I just discovered warmtone paper and want to print everything all over again : > It's quite a process but SO much more enjoyable and rewarding when that final print is complete. I can never see myself going back.

  10. #20
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ITD View Post
    Yes, that does make things much easier, but I was travelling using only public transport this year, and the MF gear coupled with a tripod was near impossible - I tried it on one of the trips, but it weighed me down far too much.
    I don't know how limited the gear is you are carrying, but my mobile LF set does not weigh more than 35mm. A good 70-200mm 2.8 lens for 35mm weighs in at a staggering 1.8kg, that is about as much as my whole Tachihara view camera! Taking in other lenses and a reflexbody with vertical grip, my whole gear for 35mm probably weighs about 12kg, including a sturdy tripod. I can do the same for LF... and carry it along just as comfortably...

    Well, OK, comparatively , I once read an article about Frans Lanting, which is a famous Dutch wildlife photographer who has worked for National Geographic as well. He carried more than 300(!!!) :o kg of 35mm equipment along in some 15 cases

    I would like to see the face of the conductor when he passes by to check his tickets...

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