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  1. #11

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  2. #12

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    Thanks tschmid, Very good article and explains in greater detail then what I have encountered before.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  3. #13
    lee
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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Jorge @ Apr 30 2003, 04:06 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> Instead of doing one and then the other, why dont you run both exposures on the same paper.
    </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    I used to do this but is always seems to confuse me. If an image is worth printing, it is worth running the tests. I always run the blue light first. It really doesn&#39;t matter because photons don&#39;t care who goes first. Those without the Aristo VCL head or the Zone VI two color head The hardest filter you have (magenta) allows you to control the shadow area. After I run that test usually at 5 second intervals, I process and look for the first HINT of black. Next, I make a test print at the time I gleaned from the blue light test print. Then I go back and turn on the green light and make another test on the blue light exposure. Low contrast filters (yellow as soft as you can get yellow #0 works just fine) will control the high light. Look for the highlight with this exposure and then go back and try out your times by making a print. IF you need to adjust the shadow or the highlight do so by varying the time of that filter. I would only adjust one light at a time. If you are printing with the yellow and magenta filters you are working in the subtractive method the blue and green is the additive method. There are those who will tell you that you can achieve the same print quality with one exposure and one filter but that has not been my experience. I have used this method for about 6 years and I now do every print this way. If I can help answer questions please feel free to contact me and I will try and answer your questions.

    lee&#092;c

  4. #14

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (tschmid @ May 1 2003, 11:39 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> For additional online-information, take a look at:
    http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/ktphotonics/...adePrinting.pdf
    http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/ktphotonics/...adePrinting.pdf </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    I have been teaching myself in a vacuum, so my jargon probably won&#39;t match up and these articles make some sense to but I notice that in the first article, Mr. Woodhouse says, " Once you expose the paper to light, you cannot remove its effect. So to enhance and existing latent image one can only add light to it. It is impossible to increase local tonal separation in say a shadow area that is already dense and dull, or alternately to add sparkle to highlights. . ."

    This is technically accurate of course, only more like can be added, but there is a process which allows for dramatic enhancement of shadow details while keeping the whites pristine. It is called the Emmerman process and does involve exposing paper which has been soaked for about two minutes in developer. Then half of the overall exposure time is exposed, wait two to three minutes, wherein the paper/film begins to develop its own contrast mask, then proceed to develop for 2/3 the original tested exposure time. The extra time is needed once the developer has been working. Now develop as usual from here. I&#39;ve used it a couple of times, and its a bit messy but very satisfying results.
    Embrace **it! **it. . .just another name for fertilizer. . . Grow baby Grow!

  5. #15

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Darkroom ChromaCrafts @ May 4 2003, 08:29 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I&#39;ve used it a couple of times, and its a bit messy but very satisfying results.</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    Jill,

    back in 1977 as Ralph Hattersley described the Emmerman in his Book "Photographic Printing", he didn&#39;t knew that today most photographic papers do have developer substances already incorporated (which is a problem for some alternative processes, e.g. Lith). With current RC papers (and most FB papers, too), you don&#39;t need to soak the paper in developer. A soda solution is less messy and will usually suffice. It gives you more time and better control to handle the print. Paper developing times are quite short these days. Use normal paper developer only for the final development step.

  6. #16

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    I've been following this thread and another that is closely related for a while and decided to dedicate a whole darkroom session to trying split tone printing yesterday. As I rent a darkroom I had preselected what I wanted to print, mainly material that had a full range of tones.
    I had mixed results but the ones that worked really worked well. I had prints with punch for the first time.
    It was noticable that the ratio of LC(00) to HC(5) times were nearly always 2:1 for the normal negs. My troubles started with negs that were over or under exposed (Hey I am Human) and even with test strips I struggled to get the balance without muddy highlights. I will have to practice the technique as I was very impressed with the ones that worked.

  7. #17

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    So Les, do you use split contrast printing for all of your negatives? I've read about it several times, and also have an RH Designs timer and am still learning how to use IT effectively right now. I've never tried split contrast printing. But I'm following this with interest and may want to give it a try. How do you use the timer...I mean picking the correct zonal scale when you make your test exposures?

    Thanks for an interesting thread everyone,
    Chris

  8. #18

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    My experience has been that you can split-print any negative with advantages over printing on graded paper. With a thin negative, the exposure will use more blue and less green light. You could have a situation where part of the print (or even the whole print) recieves only the blue light (making it roughly the same as a grade 5 paper). With a dense negative the exposure will use more green and less blue. The great benefit is the control of local contrast and in my opinion it simplifies the printing process. Now if only they made a VC Azo.
    George

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisl
    So Les, do you use split contrast printing for all of your negatives? I've read about it several times, and also have an RH Designs timer and am still learning how to use IT effectively right now. I've never tried split contrast printing. But I'm following this with interest and may want to give it a try. How do you use the timer...I mean picking the correct zonal scale when you make your test exposures?

    Thanks for an interesting thread everyone,
    Chris
    I would never use split grade printing when the negative is low in contrast, IMO that is the route to dull muddy prints. When the negative lacks contrast any use of soft filtration, ie grade 0, cannot possibly help achieve either separation or contrast. When I have to print such a negative I generally start with grade 4 and if necessary move to grade 5.

    10 years ago when I started to use VC paper I very quickly realised that negative contrast is the key to split grade printing. After carrying out tests on contrast levels I very quickly got to the point of exposing and processing negatives that are very high in contrast and suit the method of using grade 0 and grade 5 only. My view of why split grade printing works is that the negative acts as a mask and where the negative is dense (the highlight) it blocks the hard (grade 5) filtration. Consequently, the first exposure with soft filtration is used to control the tonality in the highlight and the second exposure with hard filtration adds contrast and separation in both mid tones and shadows but has little effect on the highlights. Having said that, all highlights have small dark areas where the negative is less dense allowing some hard fitration exposure that introduces a change in the micro contrast of the highlight and consequently enhances detail and texture.

    I use the RH Designs fStop Pro Timer but not in the split grade printing mode. I use the two channels, one for soft filtration and the second for hard fitration. I also use it at 1/6th stop increments and when fine tuning use the 1 /24th stop setting, sometimes I work to 1 or 2/10ths of 1 second in my exposures to achieve the exact tonality in the highlight that I require. In the many split grade printing workshops that I have taught the most frequent problem that I see is that the exposure given with soft filtration is far too long. I always encourage my students to print the highlight using the soft filtration to a tone just above paper base white and they find that when the hard filtration is added the highlight will "sing".

  10. #20

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    Thanks for the further explanation Les!
    That makes sense about choosing dense negatives that'll work with this process.

    I ended up getting the Analyser Pro actually that doesn't have the 2 channels spec. for split grade unfort. Nor the dry down feature. May just have to put in regular timer mode and ignore the metering mode when I want to try split gr printing.

    Again, Thanks for the information!
    Chris

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