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  1. #11
    matti's Avatar
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    It seems like getting another one will just cause confusion (if I don't get me five new ones). Maybe it would be best to make some test prints wide open and focus under or over the point where the focuser says. If the under and over focused prints don't look better, then I might stop worrying.

    /matti

  2. #12

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    When I bought a grain focuser sometime back, it was an eye-opening experience. I proceeded to get rid of the old and cloudy 50/2.8 El Nikkor lens I had been using in favor of a 50/2.8 Rodenstock Rodagon. I also bought a glass negative carrier and did a little adjusting on the enlarger. I compare my recent prints with older ones and the difference in sharpness is astounding.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    I will be honest though I don't quite see an advantage of the Blue filter. im told because the paper is sensitive to blue light the blue filter lets u focus the blue wave lenghts more accurately.
    The problem with this theory is that the human eye is a rather poor device, optically speaking, and focus in the human eye varies with color. Pat Gainer wrote a piece for Photo Techniques a while back called "Hazards of the Grain Focuser" or something similar. (I don't have the issue in front of me at the moment, so this is from memory.) He related some theory and the results of some tests he did. He found that he achieved the best focus when using white or green light. I've done some even simpler tests myself and I've found that the apparent best focus does vary with the color of the light, so I'm willing to accept Gainer's conclusions, at least tentatively. I now use green light for focusing. (My enlarger is an additive color model, so I've got separate red, green, and blue lights.)

  4. #14
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    Ctein has a section in his book on this topic. He also mentions Gainer's article.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  5. #15
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    im so glad to have heard this I will look at gainers article now. I don't use the blue filter its just been an added accessory sitting here in the lab. I don't have a choice with my enlarger i either focus under green or I focus under green.

  6. #16
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    In my 30s a focusing aid wasn't needed. Ten or twenty years later they were useful. Now nothing insures sharp prints. Could it be , , , ?

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