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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by 23mjm View Post
    The condenser on my Beseler enlarger does not focus the light. What it does is provide a flat smooth light across the negitive.
    So, it's not a condenser, then, I think, but a diffuser.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by 23mjm View Post
    The bottom of the condenser is a flat milky white piece of plastic,
    but it is a color head, if that matters.
    Doubly diffuse + a condensed light source. I've considered that,
    a bottom diffuser disk, thin and placed within the condenser
    housing at the condenser's bottom. Was that a DIY, the
    bottom piece of plastic? Dan

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by agenkin View Post
    Thanks for the replies, everyone, although they are a bit in conflict with each other.

    What Richard writes makes sense (about condenser matched to a lens focal length), I wonder why the theory doesn't meet the practice for those who reported using larger condensers with shorter lenses.

    Is there a good book or an online resource explaining in detail how a condenser enlarger works?
    The short answer to your question is yes you can do what you suggest in your OP. At the cheaper end of the market there are condenser enlargers with one condenser for formats from 35mm to 6x7 e.g. the Meopta Opemus 7 I use sometimes. Provided you match the lens to the negative format - 80mm for 6x6 - then I doubt you could spot any difference with the naked eye. As someone suggested there may be slightly less light fall off using a condenser intended for a slightly larger format and bigger minimum lens aperture but again I would suggest practically immaterial to your final print.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by agenkin View Post
    Thanks for the replies, everyone, although they are
    a bit in conflict with each other.

    What Richard writes makes sense (about condenser matched
    to a lens focal length), I wonder why the theory doesn't meet
    the practice for those who reported using larger condensers
    with shorter lenses.

    Is there a good book or an online resource explaining in
    detail how a condenser enlarger works?
    I wondered about that reasoning myself upon receiving
    the instructions for my Omega B8 from Classic Enlargers.
    The instructions left one with the impression that
    a shorter focal length enlarging lens REQUIRED
    some one of two supplementary condensers.

    Mr. Knoppow may have negative format and light
    levels upon the easel in mind. Small formats generally
    require greater magnification so a more intense level
    of light upon the negative in order to print with
    reasonably short exposures.

    As has been mentioned a single set of condensers
    which provides illumination of the largest format
    will do for any smaller format though the level
    of illumination at the negative stage will be
    that of the largest format.

    Supplementary condensers for smaller formats are
    an EXTRA and not supplied with all enlargers. Dan

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