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  1. #1

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    Keeping paper flat

    Hi All,
    First, let me say that I have learned a great amount of knowledge from APUG, thanX.

    I would like comments on a method I tried to keep enlarging paper flat on a piece of glass set on the baseboard of my enlarger. I did this out of desperation, the paper I have is badly curled. In fact, when I taped the corners, the middle popped up.

    Well, like I said, in desperation, I sponged a VERY light coating of water on the glass and rolled the paper onto the glass starting at a long edge. The paper, of course was now VERY, very flat. So flat, in fact, it required a razor under an edge to lift the paper.

    I printed seven shots this day using water to hold the paper flat to the glass. I don't see anything that is different in the prints I did without water, except the image is better focused edge to edge.

    I'll admit, I'm a newbie, so have fun with my idea. Comments very welcome.

  2. #2

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    Sorry, should have mentioned the paper is Ilford MG IV RC.

  3. #3
    Mike Té's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG, Tim.

    Interesting idea; sort of like vacuum easel rather through surface tension... I'm not the one who can answer your question, though, so once again I too will learn some more via APUG, once someone more knowledgeable chimes in.
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

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    Mike Té's Avatar
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    You'd think that RC paper (or any fresh paper) would be manageable. Maybe taping 4 corners is not enough control for a particularly "roll prone" batch. I suspect that an easel would help you at least most of the way.

    Quote Originally Posted by tim_bessell View Post
    Sorry, should have mentioned the paper is Ilford MG IV RC.
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

  5. #5

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    I did try raising the humidity in my "darkroom" from 35% to 50% with little difference. One reason I'm not using an easel is I needed borderless prints. I don't think an easel would have helped; the center pops ~1/16" up when the edges are held down.

  6. #6
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    a combo will work too.

    I have some Royal RA4, cut from a roll, and boy does it curl. Extra heavy base. So I tried it on the vaccuum easel with a mask to cover most of the holes the paper I was exposing. No success. So it is glas over the vaccuum easel, and the thing then is pulled flat.

  7. #7
    richard ide's Avatar
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    There is no reason why you can not expose paper when it is wet. Some enlargers for aerial photography had provisions for using wet paper. IIRC it was for compensating for shrinkage. I used one type of Kodak paper which would change dimension by almost an inch over the 42" width.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  8. #8
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    and for a new twist on contrast control...

    soak the sheet in developer, and then lay on the glass. Dab up any super wet spots.

    Use to expose a very contrasty negative, that a hard grade filter does not print well. The developer that has soaked in will exhaust where the negative is too thin, and not so when the neg is overly thick. The image on the paper kind of disappears as it devlops at the same time it is being exposed by the negative.

    Peel the paper off the glass, into the stop and fix,and wipe up.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilde View Post
    soak the sheet in developer, and then lay on the glass. Dab up any super wet spots.

    Use to expose a very contrasty negative, that a hard grade filter does not print well. The developer that has soaked in will exhaust where the negative is too thin, and not so when the neg is overly thick. The image on the paper kind of disappears as it devlops at the same time it is being exposed by the negative.

    Peel the paper off the glass, into the stop and fix,and wipe up.
    The Emmermann Process, does not work well with most modern papers do not work well, I guess the optical brighterns.

  10. #10
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim_bessell View Post
    ...
    Well, like I said, in desperation, I sponged a VERY light coating of water on the glass and rolled the paper onto the glass starting at a long edge. The paper, of course was now VERY, very flat. So flat, in fact, it required a razor under an edge to lift the paper...
    The "classical solution" is glycerine. It lasts a little longer.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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